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During Christmas break, 36 Waynesburg University students will travel to different countries to serve others. University faculty and staff will lead three mission service trips covering a variety of academic and professional interests. 

The projects include partnerships with the Mission Academy Ministries in Nassau, Bahamas, a nutritional center in Patzun, Guatemala and Trans World Radio (TWR) in the Caribbean island, Bonaire. 

Mission Academy Ministries – Nassau, Bahamas

Nine students from Waynesburg University’s Education Department will travel to Nassau, Bahamas, during their Christmas break for a mission service trip. From Sunday, Jan. 4, to Saturday, Jan. 10, the students will work in conjunction with Mission Academy Ministries to assist in public school classes and build relationships with teachers and students. 

They will also spend time with the children during recess and lunch and can observe in the classrooms. Dr. Julia Bausman and Deana Mack, assistant professors of education at Waynesburg University, will lead the team of students.

Nutritional Center – Patzun, Guatemala

Twenty Waynesburg University students will spend Friday, Jan. 2, to Saturday, Jan. 10, serving at a nutritional center in Patzun, Guatemala. Pat Bristor, associate dean of students at the University, and Laurie Steere, resident director at the University, will lead the team. 

While at the center, students will spend time with the residents, as well as assist with building a cinder block wall around the perimeter of the backyard at the facility.

Trans World Radio – Caribbean island of Bonaire

Seven students from the Waynesburg University’s Department of Communication will spend part of their Christmas breaking working with Trans World Radio (TWR), an international broadcast ministry on the Caribbean island of Bonaire. The students will spend Friday, Jan. 2, through Sunday, Jan. 11, assisting TWR in creating production schedules, radio lines, videos and promotional materials. 

Beth Merry, instructor of communication at the University; Chad Sherman, assistant professor of communication; Jacquelyn Core, University provost and vice president for academic affairs; and Karen Younger, assistant professor of history, will lead the team of students.

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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b2ap3_thumbnail_DeVito.jpgWaynesburg University’s DeVito Lecture Series will host Dr. Robert Lupton Thursday, Jan. 15, at 7:30 p.m., in Alumni Hall. Admission is free, and the public is invited to attend Lupton’s lecture, “Toxic Charity – How Churches and Charities Hurt Those They Help, and How to Reverse it.”

In his lecture, Lupton takes an in-depth look at caring, well-meaning people and their tendencies to unintentionally do more harm than good in their attempts to assist those in need. He talks about the principals of charity and the unintended consequences and offers practical remedies to correct the harm and replace it with new paradigms of service.

Dr. Lupton has invested the past 43 years of his life in inner-city Atlanta as a Christian community developer and entrepreneur who brings together communities of resource with communities of need. In response to a call that he first felt while serving in Vietnam, he left a budding business career to work with delinquent urban youth. His life’s work has been the rebuilding of urban neighborhoods where families can flourish and children can grow into healthy adults.

Through Focus Community Strategies (FCS) Urban Ministries, a non-profit organization which he founded, Dr. Lupton has developed three mixed-income subdivisions, organized two multi-racial congregations, started a number of businesses, created housing for hundreds of families and initiated a wide range of human services in his community.  

He is the author of five books: “Compassion, Justice and the Christian Life,” “Renewing the City,” “Return Flight,” “Theirs is the Kingdom” and “Toxic Charity.”  

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

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b2ap3_thumbnail_McCracken.jpgDr. Helen McCracken joined Waynesburg University as the director of Graduate Programs in Education Monday, Nov.10, 2014. McCracken will coordinate aspects of the Graduate Education Programs including oversight of all degree, certification, endorsement and advanced studies programs, as well as student recruitment, retention and advising.

“We are privileged to make Dr. McCracken a part of our team,” said Dr. Jacquelyn Core, vice president for Academic Affairs and provost of Waynesburg University. “She brings with her a wealth of experience, allowing us to take our graduate education program to new levels.”

McCracken brings to Waynesburg University an impressive background as well as an enthusiasm for Christian higher education. She has extensive experience in K-12 education, serving a number of years in the Canon-McMillan school district, most recently as the superintendent.  

She has also worked as an assistant professor at California University of Pennsylvania in its Department of Secondary Education and Administrative Leadership, both instructing and developing programs.  

She holds a doctorate degree from the University of Pittsburgh and master’s degrees from both Robert Morris University (MBA) and California University of Pennsylvania (M.Ed.). 

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b2ap3_thumbnail_imagerrrr.jpgWaynesburg University’s Criminal Justice Club participated in the Pittsburgh Polar Bear Plunge at Heinz Field Saturday, Dec. 6, to raise money for Special Olympics. 

Approximately 20 students joined Waynesburg University instructor of criminal justice James Tanda in the plunge. The Criminal Justice Club raised more than $1,500 leading up to the event. This was the second year that the club participated. In two years, the club has raised more than $2,500. 

The Pittsburgh Polar Bear Plunge Weekend is Special Olympics Pennsylvania’s largest fundraiser, grossing more than 1 million dollars during the first four years. Individuals and teams, alongside Special Olympics athletes, take the plunge into the Ohio River on Pittsburgh’s North Shore. 

Student representatives from freshmen to seniors gave up their Saturday to join more than 1,800 other plungers in the freezing rain for the cause. This year, the air temperature was 39 degrees and the water temperature was 38 degrees at the time of the plunge.

“Our goal was to follow the University's mission of service to this very needy cause while also connecting our criminal justice and forensic science students to a network of law enforcement, attorneys, federal agencies and others in the profession,” said Tanda.   “This year's donation will be used to help further the mission of Special Olympics Pennsylvania and help support the more than 20,000 athletes served in the commonwealth.”

According to Tanda, half of the money raised by Waynesburg’s Criminal Justice Club will go directly to Greene County's Special Olympics program, which Waynesburg's Criminal Justice Club resurrected last year.

Tanda has plunged every year since the event’s inception - both as an agent with his former federal agency - and now leading Waynesburg's involvement in the service project.

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COA-Fall14.jpgHosted by the Waynesburg University Fine Arts Department and the Waynesburg University Music Program, TUBACHRISTMAS will be held at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Dec. 12, in the Goodwin Performing Arts Center on the campus of Waynesburg University. Admission is free, and the public is cordially invited to attend. 

Local tuba and baritone/euphonium players are invited to take part in the annual performance. 

Concert registration is at 5 p.m., followed by rehearsal from 5:30 to 7 p.m. in the Goodwin Performing Arts Center.

TUBACHRISTMAS is meant to recognize musical heritage and honor all great artists and teachers whose legacy has provided high performance standards, well-structured pedagogy, professional integrity, personal values and a camaraderie envied by all other instrumentalists. 

Performers will include any interested tuba, euphonium and baritone players in the area. Audience members will become part of an established tradition throughout the world and enjoy their favorite holiday tunes as never before through the rich, organ-like sound of this low-brass ensemble.

TUBACHRISTMAS was conceived in 1974 as a tribute to the late artist and teacher William J. Bell, born on Christmas in 1902. The traditional Christmas music performed at the first TUBACHRISTMAS was arranged by American composer Alec Wilder who died December 24, 1980. Wilder composed many solo and ensemble compositions for tuba and euphonium and was a loyal supporter of every effort to improve the literature and public image of these instruments. 

Register online at waynesburg.edu/web/music. For more information, contact Ronda DePriest at rdepris@waynesburg.edu or 724-852-3420.

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

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