Athletic Training and Exercise Science at Waynesburg University

Athletic training is practiced by athletic trainers, health care professionals who collaborate with physicians to optimize activity and participation of patients and clients. Athletic training encompasses the prevention, diagnosis, and intervention of emergency, acute, and chronic medical conditions involving impairment, functional limitations, and disabilities.
Athletic trainers work in professional sports, colleges and universities, secondary schools, physician offices, hospitals and outpatient clinics, occupational settings (i.e. factories, industrial settings), the military, the performing arts, and in public safety (fire, police, EMS).
Accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE), the Waynesburg University Athletic Training Program (ATP) provides students with the means, inspiration and values to pursue lives of service in the domains of injury prevention, emergency care, evaluation, treatment, rehabilitation and research. Successful completion of Waynesburg’s program enables students to sit for the Board of Certification (BOC) examination.

Exercise Science is the science of human movement, serving to optimize exercise, physical activity, and lifestyle management for all people. A goal of exercise science remains to help all individuals achieve an optimal level of health and well-being
Exercise Science professionals work in industrial and corporate settings (worksite wellness, fitness and wellness directors), athletic settings (strength and conditioning coaches, performance enhancement specialists), community or government settings (adult fitness, pediatric fitness), medical institutions (cardiac rehabilitation), and/or as researchers.

Career Paths

AT-ES
*Note: Some areas may require certification or additional education.

Facilities

Waynesburg University’s Athletic Training Clinic allows students from the Athletic Training Program to gain hands-on experience assessing and treating athletic injuries.

Programs Offered

The Athletic Training Major

The Athletic Training Basic Program (ATBP)

This program consists of basic course work and directed clinical observation taken during the first year to build a foundation of basic knowledge in athletic training. Students must then apply for admission into the ATAP during the second semester of the freshman year.

The Athletic Training Advanced Program (ATAP)

For students admitted, the last three years entail advanced specialized courses and clinical practicum experiences. Both the ATBP and ATAP consist of formal course work and clinical observation/proficiencies requirements. Students must fulfill these requirements and progress from ATBP to ATAP. Selection of athletic training students into the ATAP is based on specific guidelines set forth by Waynesburg University Athletic Training Education Program (see admission policy). A ratio of 8:1 is recommended (eight students to one certified athletic trainer) to ensure adequate clinical instruction and supervision of students within the ATAP. As such, Waynesburg University has established academic and clinical requirements for progression within the Athletic Training Education Program with a selection process into the ATAP program (see clinical education requirements).

Excercise Science Major

Wellness/Physiology Track

As an exercise science major with a focus on wellness and physiology, you can pursue a career in a variety of settings and will be directly involved in exercise prescription, community health and wellness. We prepare students for further education in graduate or professional programs.

Fitness Management Track

As an exercise science major enrolled in the fitness management track, you will focus not only on health and wellness, but also on the business aspect of the exercise and healthcare industry.  Graduates are prepared to not only work as fitness professionals, but also manage the business of fitness centers.

Exercise Science Minor

Our exercise science minor covers much of the coursework involved in achieving a wellness/physiology or fitness management track exercise science major. It makes a perfect complement to anyone wishing to pursue professional programs after graduating with a bachelor of science degree from Waynesburg University.

Admission Policy

During the second semester of the freshman year, students enrolled at Waynesburg University and have declared athletic training as the major course of study must formally apply for admission into the ATAP. Applications for admission into the ATAP are accepted only once per year; the deadline for application is February 1 of the freshman year.

Students wishing to apply for admission to the ATAP must meet the following requirements:

  1. Complete full application packet for admission (Appendix E in the ATEP Student Handbook).
  2. Be a full-time student at Waynesburg University.
  3. Officially declare Athletic Training as a major with the Office of the Registrar.
  4. Achieve a minimum of a C- in all required courses in the athletic training major including:
    1. ATP105 – Introduction to Athletic Training
    2. ATP 207 – Emergency Response in Athletics
    3. BIO105 – Medical Terminology
    4. BIO 109 – Human Anatomy
    5. ATP 205 – Survey of Athletic Injury & AT Techniques
  5. Maintain an overall GPA of 2.50.
  6. Obtain a minimum of 100 clock hours of directed clinical observation in the Waynesburg University Athletic Training Room by the end of the spring semester of the freshman year.
  7. Have documentation of Physical Exam and Hepatitis B vaccination.
  8. Meet the written Technical Standards of the ATEP with or without reasonable accommodation.
  9. Complete an interview with the Athletic Training Academic Standards Committee consisting of the athletic training faculty, department chairperson and one to two athletic training staff members.
  10. Complete and pass an entrance exam with a score of 70 percent or better.
  11. Be an active member of the ATSA.
    1. Attend monthly meetings
    2. Participate in a minimum of one service activity
    3. Participate in a minimum of one fundraiser activity
    4. Be involved with a minimum of one committee

The candidate's application will be evaluated and selection into the ATAP will be based upon the following:

  1. Overall academic achievement (GPA, 2.5 minimum mandatory)
  2. Academic achievement within the required courses in the athletic training major
  3. Clinical Observation Hours (100 minimum, mandatory)
  4. Entrance Examination
  5. Letters of recommendation
  6. Essay
  7. Interview
  8. Active membership in ATSA

The student should refer to Appendix E in the ATEP Student Handbook for scoring of above criteria. Admission into the ATAP is competitive and only a limited number (14) of students will be accepted on a yearly basis. If a candidate is denied admission to the ATAP, the student may reapply to the ATAP the following year once deficiencies are rectified.

Retention in ATAP

Once accepted into the ATAP, students are expected to meet the following criteria to graduate:

  • Maintain a GPA of 2.5 overall
  • Receive a C- or better in all required courses for the Athletic Training major.
  • Pass with a score of 70 percent or better on the yearly comprehensive exam.
  • Achieve mastery(>70 percent) on all clinical proficiencies.
  • Complete all clinical responsibilities as assigned.
  • Maintain NATA student membership.
  • Maintain student portfolio as assigned in ATP practicum courses.
  • Demonstrate active membership in the ATSA.
    • Attend monthly meetings
    • Participate in a minimum of one service activity
    • Participate in a minimum of one fundraiser activity
    • Be involved with a minimum of one committee

BOC Exam Pass Rate

Board of Certification Examination Results

In order to obtain a certification in athletic training, a person must be a graduate of an athletic training program accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE) and must also pass the Board of Certification (BOC) Examination. Information regarding this process is available at www.bocatc.org. The data for graduates of Waynesburg University Athletic Training Education Program and BOC data are presented in the table below.

BOC Pass Rate Data

  2010
-2011
2011
-2012
2012
-2013
3 yr
aggregate
Number of students graduating from program. 7 6 9 22
Number of students graduating from program who took examination. 6 6 6 18
Number of students who passed the examination on the first attempt. 3 4 4 11
Percentage of students who passed the examination on the first attempt. 50 66.67 66.67 61.11
Number of students who passed the examination regardless of the number of attempts. 4 5 4 13
Percentage of students who passed the examination regardless of the number of attempts. 66.67 83.33 66.67 72.22

Source: CAATE

Athletic Training Curriculum

The Athletic Training and Exercise Science curricula are based on a science foundation including human anatomy and physiology, kinesiology and exercise.

ATP 105. Introduction to Athletic Training 3 credits

An introduction to many facets of athletic training and the role of the athletic trainer. Includes components of injury prevention, recognition and immediate care, rehabilitation and reconditioning, health care administration, and professional development. Fall

ATP 201. Athletic Training Clinical Practicum I 1 credit

Application and assessment of clinical proficiencies is emphasized specific to transporting, medical care and emergency procedures. This is a laboratory course meeting two hours a week. Prerequisites: BIO 109; ATP 105, 207 and official acceptance into the A.T.A.P. Fall

ATP 202. Athletic Training Clinical Practicum II 1 credit

Application and assessment of clinical proficiencies is emphasized specific to taping techniques, pre-participation exam, protective equipment, environmental conditions, and injury management. This is a laboratory course meeting two hours a week. Prerequisites: BIO 109, 207; ATP 105, 201, 205, 207 and official acceptance into the A.T.A.P. Spring

ATP 205. Survey of Athletic Injuries and Athletic Training Techniques 3 credits

A course designed to familiarize the student with common athletic injuries as well as to develop basic athletic training skills for the beginning athletic training student. Emphasis will be directed toward the etiology and pathophysiology of common athletic injuries, basic injury evaluation format, contemporary immobilization and ambulation devices, and protective equipment, padding, and taping in sports. Two hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory each week. Co-requisite: BIO 109, proof of current First Aid and Professional Rescuer CPR certification or current enrollment in either HSC 136 or ATP 207. Prerequisite: ATP 105 or permission of instructor. Does not count as a General Education Requirement in science. Spring

ATP 206. Personal and Community Health and Wellness 2 credits

A study of the practical application of health principles concerning personal and community health and wellness. Topics include health promotion, Healthy People 2010/2020, as well as current topics of concern for personal and community health. Students will discuss different views of professionals in the health field and form opinions based on evidence collected. Spring

ATP 207. Emergency Response in Athletics † 3 credits

This course entails the study of advanced first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation to prepare one to respond to emergency situations. Emphasis will be directed toward prevention, first aid treatment, emergency care, and transportation of the sick and injured in an athletic environment. Students receive certification for Health Providers CPR and First Aid through the American Red Cross or American Heart Association upon scoring a passing grade indicated by each organization. Two hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory period each week. Prerequisites: Athletic Training majors only. Does not count as a General Education Requirement in science. An additional fee will be required to cover cost of certification cards and pocket mask. Spring

ATP 301. Athletic Training Clinical Practicum III 2 credits

Application and assessment of clinical proficiencies is emphasized specific to assessment and evaluation of athletic injury and illness. This is a laboratory course meeting 3 hours a week. Prerequisites: ATP 202, 311 and 312 and official acceptance into the A.T.A.P. Fall

ATP 302. Athletic Training Clinical Practicum IV 2 credits

Application and assessment of clinical proficiencies is emphasized specific to strength and conditioning of healthy populations. This is a laboratory course meeting three hours a week. Prerequisites: ATP 301; ESC 209 and official acceptance into the A.T.A.P. Spring

ATP 306. Therapeutic Modalities 4 credits

This course entails the study of pain management techniques and mediation of theory and practice of therapeutic modalities. Includes discussion of superficial heat, cold, electrotherapy, hydrotherapy, ultrasound, compression, traction, and massage. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory period each week. Prerequisites: BIO 105, 109, 207, 216, AND athletic training or BIO-pre-physical therapy major. Does not count as a General Education Requirement in science. Fall

ATP 307. Therapeutic Exercise 4 credits

This course entails the study of the theory and application of exercise, rehabilitation techniques, and therapeutic exercise equipment for the rehabilitation of athletic injuries. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory period each week. Prerequisites: ATP 311, 312, BIO 105, 109, 207, 216, AND athletic training or BIOpre- physical therapy major. Does not count as a General Education Requirement in science. Fall

ATP 311. Injury Evaluation I 2 credits

This course presents the techniques used in injury/illness evaluation and assessment. In-depth analysis of the mechanism of injury, anatomy and physiology of the injury, and signs and symptoms associated with the injury/illness. Appropriate process of evaluation, diagnostic testing, documentation and terminology is presented. The focus of injuries for this course includes lower extremity, lumbar spine and hip/pelvis pathologies. Orthopedic neurological and general medical evaluations are included. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory period each week. Prerequisites: ATP 205; BIO 105, 109, 207. Co-requisite: BIO 216. Does not count as a General Education Requirement in science. Fall

ATP 312. Injury Evaluation II 2 credits

This course presents the techniques used in injury/illness evaluation and assessment. In-depth analysis of the mechanism of injury, anatomy and physiology of the injury and signs and symptoms associated with the injury/illness. Appropriate process of evaluation, diagnostic testing, documentation and terminology is presented. The focus of injuries for this course includes upper extremity, cervical spine and general medical pathologies as well as head and face injury evaluation. Orthopedic, neurological and general medical evaluations are included. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory period each week. Prerequisite: ATP 311. Does not count as a General Education Requirement in science. Spring

ATP 401. Athletic Training Clinical Practicum V 2 credits

Application and assessment of clinical proficiencies is emphasized specific to rehabilitation including modalities and therapeutic exercise. This is a laboratory course meeting three hours a week. Prerequisites: ATP 302, 306, 307 and official acceptance into the A.T.A.P. Fall

ATP 402. Athletic Training Clinical Practicum VI 2 credits

Application and assessment of clinical proficiencies is emphasized specific to general medical, nutrition, pharmacology, professional development, administration, and psychology. This is laboratory course meeting three hours a week. Prerequisites: HSC 206; ESC 205; PSY 105; ATP 401; enrolled in ATP 405, 407 and official acceptance into the A.T.A.P. Spring

ATP 405. Administration of Athletic Training 3 credits

This course examines the various issues, policies, and procedures involved with the administration of athletic training in the traditional and non-traditional settings. Emphasis is on facility organization and design, legal liability, personnel management, budgeting, equipment purchasing, and record keeping. Prerequisite: Official acceptance into the A.T.A.P. Spring

ATP 406. Research Methods in Health Science 2 credits

This course is designed to study research methodology pertaining to relevant issues within the Health Science professions including Athletic Training, Exercise Science, and Physical Therapy. Specific attention is directed toward formal written communication using prescribed format. Prerequisites: MAT 215 and athletic training, exercise science, or bio-pre-physical therapy majors only. Fall

ATP 407. Seminar in Athletic Training and Health Science 2 credits

A course designed to address major issues and special topics in contemporary athletic training, exercise science, and physical therapy. Particular attention will be given to the professional development, employment settings and graduate opportunities, the role of allied health professionals, and legal, political, ethical, and other controversial issues affecting the professions. Special topics relating to technological advances, research, pharmacology, and special populations, evaluation and treatment techniques will be addressed. Prerequisite: Major in athletic training, exercise science, or bio-prephysical therapy only. Spring

ATP 465. Athletic Training Fieldwork 2-6 credits

Professional field experience is designed to provide the student with opportunity for on-the-job experience in different settings. The professional field experience is intended to offer a challenge to students and test their potential and interest in selected areas in the field of Athletic Training. Prerequisites: ATP 306, 307, official acceptance into the A.T.A.P., and consent of the Program Director.

ATP 475. Advanced Faith and Learning Integration 3 credits

In the spirit of the mission of Waynesburg University, this course intends to provide junior and senior level students with an unparalleled opportunity to integrate the Bible materials and its history of interpretation to the academic disciplines. Students who wish to engage in this level of theological reflection on vocation should consult with both their academic advisors and with the Chair of the Biblical and Ministry Studies Major Program. See page 116 for further information. This course will not substitute for senior capstone/research courses required in the majors. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing; three credits in BMS courses; 3.0 minimum grade point average. (Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit.)

ATP 497. Independent Study: Rehabilitation Project 2 credits

An in-depth written report and development of rehabilitation program on selected individual case studies using theory and techniques in rehabilitation of athletic injuries. Prerequisites: ATP 306, 307, official acceptance into the A.T.A.P., and consent of the Program Director.

Exercise Science Curriculum

HSC 105. Introduction to Health Sciences 1 credit

This course will provide a basic overview of the health science professions including;
athletic training, exercise physiology, sports nutrition, biomechanics, exercise and
sport psychology, and physical therapy. The course will also cover the professional
activities (i.e., professional organizations, certifications, professional issues, and
professional liabilities) that are related to these professional applications. Fall

HSC 136. First Aid & CPR – Professional Rescuer † 1 credit

This course will provide Professional Rescuer certification in CPR and first aid.
Enrollment is open for Exercise Science and Pre-Physical Therapy majors. Others may
be enrolled with instructor's permission.

HSC 205. Sports Medicine Concepts & Injuries 3 credits

This course is an introduction to many facets of profession in the sports medicine
arena (primarily those of exercise science and physical therapy). These include health
promotion, injury prevention, and common injuries in the active population, general
evaluation skills of injury, and taping/bracing skills. This course consists of two
hours of lecture and one two-hour lab each week. Co-requisite: HSC 136 or proof of
current CPR & FA certification, BIO 109. (This course cannot be used to fulfill the
General Education requirements for the Natural and Physical Sciences.) Spring

HSC 206. Pharmacology for the Health Sciences 3 credits

This course introduces the health science professional to the fundamental
concepts of pharmacology. It will include the basics of clinical pharmacology, drug
classifications, indications, drug action, adverse effects, and drug interactions. Open
only to non-nursing majors, including students in athletic training, exercise science,
forensic science, and pre-physical therapy. Open to others upon approval of the
instructor. Fall

HSC 207. Pathophysiological Foundations for Health Science 3 credits

This course is designed to introduce students to the pathophysiology of disease upon
completion of normal anatomy and physiology. Prerequisites: BIO 109 and BIO 207.
Spring

ESC 205. Nutrition for Fitness and Sport 3 credits

The course entails the study of basic concepts of nutrition and the effects of sound nutritional practices on everyday life and sports. The course is designed to allow students to apply nutritional concepts to enhance athletic performance and general wellness. Open only to Exercise Science, Athletic Training and BIO-Pre-Physical Therapy. Open to other majors by consent of instructor and department chair. Fall

ESC 209. Essentials of Strength and Conditioning 4 credits

This course examines the responses and adaptations to resistive, anaerobic, and aerobic exercise and training. It utilizes practical application of scientific principles to human physical conditioning programs with emphasis on enhancement of maximum strength, power and endurance exercise for various populations. Lab will focus on skill acquisition and exercise prescription in weight training, assessment, flexibility, plyometrics, and cardiovascular fitness. (Three hours of lecture and two hours of lab.) Prerequisites: BIO 109, 207, and 216. Spring

ESC 405. Advanced Cardiovascular/Respiratory Physiology 3 credits

Students will engage in the investigation and discussion of function, pathological correlation, and diagnostic procedures as it relates to the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. Emphasis will be placed on the basic knowledge, use, and interpretation of EKG and spirometry studies. Prerequisite: BIO 207. (Spring 2015 and alternate years)

ESC 406. Administration in Exercise Science 3 credits

This course examines the various issues, policies, and procedures involved with administration in exercise science. Emphasis is on facility organization and design, legal liability, personnel management, budgeting, equipment purchasing, and record keeping and promotions. Special topics will be related to fitness and wellness center administration. Spring

ESC 465. Internship in Exercise Science 3-6 credits

The internship is for junior or senior Exercise Science majors to gain practical experience with cooperating healthcare facilities, corporations, health clubs, or athletic teams. All internships will continue for one academic semester for at least ten weeks. The student must submit a written internship request to the department chair and the request must be approved by the advisor and the department before formal application to the cooperation agencies is initiated. Interns will keep a log of what they are learning from on-site activities and prepare a paper evaluating their experiences. Pass-Fail grade.

ESC 475. Advanced Faith and Learning Integration 3 credits

In the spirit of the mission of Waynesburg University, this course intends to provide junior and senior level students with an unparalleled opportunity to integrate the Bible materials and its history of interpretation to the academic disciplines. Students who wish to engage in this level of theological reflection on vocation should consult with both their academic advisors and with the Chair of the Biblical and Ministry Studies Major Program. See page 116 for further information. This course will not substitute for senior capstone/research courses required in the majors. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing; three credits in BMS courses; 3.0 minimum grade point average. (Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit.)

† indicates a special fee is charged

Testimonials One thing that sets Waynesburg apart is that students are accepted into the advanced program and begin core classes and clinical rotations sophomore year, as opposed to other schools where that doesn’t happen until the start of junior year. Having that extra year of clinical experience really helped because I was able to call on past experiences other interns may not have had.
Ryan Wockley, senior athletic training major