English & Foreign Languages at Waynesburg University

Majoring in English at Waynesburg University provides academic foundation, hands-on experience, and personalized programs and guidance. The program will help you improve reading and writing skills that can be used in all academic fields and professions. You will be able to read literature in a way that improves your perception of the world around you and develop skills needed to teach English or to write professionally. The English program is also an excellent foundation for graduate study in writing, literature, law, and non-for-profit service.

The objectives of the English program are:

  • to improve reading and writing skills that can be used in all academic areas and professions;
  • to introduce students to strategies for reading literature that can help them to become more perceptive;
  • to guide students to a knowledge of the interrelations between reading and writing;
  • to give students the depth and breadth of knowledge which will enable them to teach in this field;
  • to advance skills in professional writing, expository writing, creative writing, and research;
  • and to prepare students for graduate studies.

Students majoring in English can choose between three tracks: literature, creative writing, or professional writing. Secondary Education is offered with either the literature or the creative writing track. Each track is designed to meet the goals established above and to allow students a program that meets their individual interests.

Students have the opportunity to choose a minor area of study or to craft a personalized program in concert with their academic advisor. For example, those interested in pursuing study in the area of faith and religion can minor in Biblical and Ministry Studies and choose the appropriate courses from the literature, creative writing, and writing menus. Students interested in service to the community can minor in Service Leadership. Or, a personalized plan can be created based upon the student’s English track and his/her future interests.

At Waynesburg you will benefit from the small classroom experience taught by full-time faculty, personalized advising from caring professors and guidance in career planning. The Department of English also offers you an environment where religious beliefs are open to discussion and where you are encouraged to explore what you believe.

Programs Offered

Literature

The literature track is designed for students who want intensive reading in literature, strong interpretive skills, and practice in advanced writing. Students who complete this track are prepared for graduate studies in literature and/or writing, a career in law, or a position that requires strong communication skills.

Writing

The creative writing track is for students who want to pursue advanced skills in writing fiction, poetry, creative non-fiction, and other genres, along with study in literature and interpretive skills. Students in this track will be prepared for graduate studies in either creative writing or literature and also a position that requires strong writing skills.

English Education

Students interested in Secondary Education can choose either the literature or the creative writing track. In both tracks, students will be prepared to teach either literature or composition at the 7th-12th grade level; students who choose the creative writing track will also be prepared to teach creative writing as well.

Spanish

Spanish is offered as a minor.

English Minor

A minor in English requires students to take a minimum of 24 credits in the department as well as approval from the department.

Academic Curriculum

ENG 101. College Composition I 3 credits

Designed to enhance students' writing and reading skills, this course provides experience in writing on a wide variety of subjects and in interpreting essays and fiction. Students will also receive an introduction to college-level research and the integration of sources. Emphasis is placed on preparation for college-level writing, including the writing process and in class writing. Placement in this course is based on students' scores on standardized essay exams and their prior achievement in the field of English.

ENG 102. College Composition II 3 credits

Designed to enhance students' writing and reading skills, this course provides experience in writing on a wide variety of subjects and in interpreting drama and poetry. Students will research and write academic papers exhibiting effective use of sources and a standard style format. Emphasis is placed on the writing process, literary analysis, and in-class writing. Students are expected to engage in critical thinking about the texts and in discussions. Prerequisite: ENG 101.

ENG 155. Introduction to Creative Writing 3 credits

A workshop in the arts of fiction, poetry and drama. Students will become familiar with the conventions of each genre as they strive to develop a personal voice and style. Discussion will focus on student writing and will be supplemented by the exploration of the work of contemporary authors.

ENG 171-172. Muse & Stone Production I and II 1-1 credit

This course runs in tandem with the production of Muse & Stone, Waynesburg University's literary journal. Enrolled students serve as submission readers or editorial staff members. The course is designed to offer students theoretical and practical knowledge about literary magazines, and to develop students' aesthetic taste in judging contemporary poetry, short fiction, and creative nonfiction. Pass-fail grade. Prerequisite: ENG 155 or by instructor's permission. The course may be repeated for credit.

ENG 185. Introduction to Literary Studies 3 credits

This course provides experience in writing and interpreting literature. Students will research and write academic papers exhibiting effective use of sources and MLA style format. Emphasis is placed on the writing process, literary analysis, literary-based research, and in-class writing. Students will engage in critical thinking about the texts and class discussions. An introduction to the field of literary studies, this class is required for all English majors and is open for all who are interested in exploring the study of literature and writing. This course fulfills the second semester of the composition requirement of the General Education curriculum. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or 187. Spring

ENG 187-188. Honors College Composition 3-3 credits

Students will gain experience reading and writing in response to a variety of genres. In addition, students will research and write academic papers exhibiting effective use of sources and a standard style format. Because students in these courses are expected to possess strong writing skills, the focus will be on developing content and a sophisticated style. Emphasis will be placed on the writing process, critical thinking skills, the development of solid arguments, literary analysis, and in-class writing. Placement in these courses is based on students' scores on standardized essay exams and their prior achievement in the field of English. ENG 187 is a prerequisite for ENG 188.

ENG 206. Advanced Expository Writing 3 credits

A written communications course designed to develop or refine skills in exposition (writing to inform) and persuasion. Students will learn to generate, select, and sequence information appropriate to the purpose of the message, the subject, and the needs of the audience. Prerequisite: ENG 102 or 188. (Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit)

ENG 228. Creative Nonfiction Writing 3 credits

A workshop in creative nonfiction writing. Through reading and writing, students will become familiar with the rhetorical forms and stylistic conventions of the genre. Possible concentrations include the personal essay, impersonal essay, journalistic essay, journalistic novel, and memoir. Students are expected to demonstrate advanced writing ability and awareness of audience. Prerequisite: ENG 102 or 188. Spring

ENG 235. Topics in Literary Studies 3 credits

This course offers an introduction to the study of literature through thematic offerings aimed to help the general education student grow spiritually, intellectually, and socially; to spark a love of learning; and to think critically and communicate effectively in writing. The focus is on responsive reading and writing about literature. Topics vary per semester. Topics may include, but are not limited to, Coming of Age; Crime & Punishment; Evil; J. R. R. Tolkien and Fantasy; Love, Sex, Marriage, and the Family; Science Fiction; and Travel & Adventure. This course may be repeated up to three times for credit. Prerequisite: ENG 102, 185 or 188.

ENG 248. Intermediate Fiction Writing 3 credits

A workshop for students eager to continue their development as fiction writers. Discussion will focus on students' writing, with additional study of complete books of fiction by contemporary authors. This course will include individual conferences with the instructor. Prerequisites: ENG 102, 185 or 188; ENG 155; or permission of the instructor. (Fall 2014 and alternate years)

ENG 249. Intermediate Poetry Writing 3 credits

A workshop for students eager to continue their development as poets. Discussion will focus on students' poems, with additional study of complete books of poetry by contemporary poets. This course will include individual conferences with the instructor and opportunities to meet with distinguished visiting poets. Prerequisites: ENG 102, 185 or 188; ENG 155; or permission of the instructor. (Fall 2013 and alternate years)

ENG 256. Prosody 3 credits

A workshop course on the forms and mechanics of poetry. Students will study and write traditional Western and non-Western forms, such as the sonnet, villanelle, and haiku, as well as contemporary revisions of traditional forms and recent developments in form. The course will also address the scansion of poems with established metrical or syllabic patterns. Prerequisites: ENG 102, 185 or 188; ENG 155. Spring

ENG 295. Special Topics in Literature or Creative Writing 3 credits

A study of various particular topics – including individual authors, works, genres, themes –chosen by the members of the department in consultation with students. The topic will usually be different for each semester. This course, when offered as Special Topics in Literature, meets the literature course requirement of the General Education curriculum. Prerequisite: ENG 102, 185 or 187. (Offered when departmental resources permit)

ENG 301. American Literature I 3 credits

A study of major authors, literary periods, and terms associated with American Literature from the beginnings to 1865. Prerequisite: ENG 185, 235 or permission of Department Chair. (Spring 2014 and alternate years)

ENG 302. American Literature II 3 credits

A study of major authors, literary periods and terms associated with American Literature from 1865 to the present. Prerequisite: ENG 185, 235 or permission of Department Chair. (Spring 2015 and alternate years)

ENG 305. Research Writing Skills 3 credits

This course emphasizes collaborative writing/learning skills and research skills. Each student will research and write at least one substantial paper during the semester. This course meets the writing course requirement in the General Education curriculum. Prerequisite: ENG 102, 185 or 188. Spring

ENG 307. Language and the English Language Learner 3 credits

Strategies for meeting the instructional needs of English language learners will be emphasized in the larger context of studying the nature and history of language and how it is acquired. Prerequisite: ENG 102, 185 or 188. Spring

ENG 308. The Study of Children's Literature 3 credits

(formerly ENG 208 – 2010 WU Catalog) A study of literature written for children and of the social trends which have figured in its evolution, for the purpose of furnishing an adult reader with the background necessary for the enjoyment of this extensive literary form. This course meets the literature course requirement in the General Education curriculum. Prerequisite: ENG 102, 185 or 188; EDU 105; or permission of the instructor. Spring

ENG 311. British Literature I (formerly ENG 226 – 2010 WU Catalog) 3 credits

A study of major authors, literary periods, and terms associated with British Literature up to Romanticism. Prerequisite: ENG 185, 235 or permission of Department Chair. (Fall 2013 and alternate years)

ENG 312. British Literature II (formerly ENG 229 – 2010 WU Catalog) 3 credits

A study of major authors, literary periods, and terms associated with British Literature from Romanticism to the present. Prerequisite: ENG 185, 235 or permission of Department Chair. (Spring 2015 and alternate years)

ENG 316. Adolescent Literacy 3 credits

A study of recent literature for adolescents and appropriate instructional strategies. Prerequisites: ENG 102, 185 or 188; EDU 206. (Spring 2015 and alternate years)

ENG 317. World Literature I (formerly ENG 217 – 2010 WU Catalog) 3 credits

A study of selected works of world literature including fiction, drama, poetry, and memoir up to the 17th Century. Primary focus will be on non-European works. Prerequisite: ENG 185, 235 or permission of Department Chair. (Spring 2014 and alternate years)

ENG 318. World Literature II (formerly ENG 218 – 2010 WU Catalog) 3 credits

A study of selected works of world literature including fiction, drama, poetry, and memoir from the 17th Century to the present. Texts will be drawn from the postcolonial literature and non-European works composed in the English language representing cultural perspectives from such locals as India, Africa, and the Caribbean as well as world literature in translation. Prerequisite: ENG 185, 235 or permission of Department Chair. (Fall 2014 and alternate years)

ENG 329. Business and Professional Writing 3 credits

This course prepares students to write business and professional documents, including, but not limited to, memos, letters, reports, and resumes. Students will also gain experience in technological communication using email, presentation software and word processing programs. The focus is on clear, concise and error-free writing that follows strict format guidelines. Prerequisite: ENG 102, 185 or 188.

ENG 335. Gender and Literature 3 credits

A study of gender from traditional, feminist, and critical perspectives, as reflected in seminal works of fiction, poetry, drama and cinema. Prerequisite: ENG 185, 235 or permission of Department Chair. (Fall 2013 and alternate years)

ENG 337. Shakespeare 3 credits

A study of several plays by William Shakespeare, representing major phases of his career and the genres of comedy, tragedy, and history. Through the course, students will gain a deeper understanding of the author's major themes, poetic techniques, and modes of characterization as well as the conventions of early modern drama and theatre. (Fall 2014 and alternate years)

ENG 338. Teaching Grammar and Writing 3 credits

(formerly ENG 338, Grammar Through Writing) This course is designed to introduce prospective writing teachers to the theories, practices, and skills of composition pedagogy, which can be applied to teaching writing in a variety of learning situations, from middle and high school classrooms to first year college composition classes and writing center practicum. In this course, students will learn composition theory history and pedagogy, identify styles of teaching writing, and integrate the necessary background skills including grammar and teaching techniques. Prerequisites: ENG 102, 185 or 188; EDU 205 or permission of the instructor. (Spring 2015 and alternate years)

ENG 339. Critical Theory 3 credits

A survey of the major approaches to the analysis of texts, this course is designed to familiarize students with the work of the most significant theories, theorists and fields of study in critical theory. Students will also gain a strong command of literary terminology and will apply theory to texts and classroom teaching. Prerequisites: ENG 185 and/or at least one 300-level literature course. Fall

ENG 345. Grants Writing and Research 3 credits

An overview of fund raising with an emphasis on written communications and research in the field. Students will gain experience in writing grant proposals, fundraising letters, and brochures as well as in conducting the research necessary for such communications. Enrollment is limited to junior and senior students. This course meets the writing course requirement in the General Education curriculum. Prerequisite: ENG 102, 185 or 188. Spring

ENG 348. Advanced Fiction Writing 3 credits

A workshop for students eager to continue their development as writers. Discussion will focus on students' fiction, with additional study of contemporary stories. Also students will investigate publishing opportunities and how to submit fiction to literary magazines. A further requirement will be to complete and submit a collection of stories suitable for submission as a portfolio to graduate programs in creative writing. This course will include individual conferences with the instructor. Prerequisites: ENG 102, 185 or 188; ENG 248. (Spring 2014 and alternate years)

ENG 349. Advanced Poetry Writing 3 credits

A workshop for students eager to continue their development as poets. Discussion will focus on students' poems, with additional study of complete books of poetry by contemporary poets. Also students will investigate publishing opportunities and how to submit poems to literary magazines. This course will include individual conferences with the instructor and opportunities to meet with distinguished visiting poets. Students will be required to complete and submit a chapbook of poems by the end of the course. Prerequisites: ENG 102, 185 or 188; ENG 249. (Spring 2015 and alternate years)

ENG 358. The Bible as Literature 3 credits

This course considers the Bible as a work of literature, focusing on the literary forms found within its pages. Topics covered include cultural history of the ancient Hebrews, literature of other ancient Near Eastern cultures, prophetic and wisdom literature, the Gospels as narratives, and parables, letters, and apocalyptic writings as literature. This course does not fulfill the General Education biblical and ministry studies requirement. Prerequisite: ENG 185 or permission of Department Chair. (Spring 2015 and alternate years)

ENG 359. Writing Spiritual Autobiography 3 credits

From Augustine's Confessions to contemporary writers, spiritual autobiography is probably the most important genre of religious writing. This creative writing course will study the form by reading several texts as students draft and revise parts of their own spiritual autobiography. Prerequisites: ENG 102, 185 or 188; ENG 155. (Fall 2014 and alternate years)

ENG 385. Advanced Creative Non-Fiction 3 credits

A workshop for students eager to continue their development as writers. Discussion will focus on students' works, with additional study of contemporary authors. Also, students will investigate publishing opportunities and how to submit their work to literary magazines. Students will be expected to complete and submit a collection of creative non-fiction suitable for submission as a portfolio to a graduate program. Prerequisite: ENG 228. (Offered when departmental resources permit)

ENG 395. Special Topics in Literature or Creative Writing 3 credits

A study of various particular topics – including individual authors, works, genres, themes –chosen by the members of the department in consultation with students. The topic will usually be different for each semester. This course, when offered as Special Topics in Literature, meets the literature course requirement of the General Education curriculum. Prerequisite: ENG 185 or permission of Department Chair. (Offered when departmental resources permit)

ENG 435. Senior Seminar in Literature 3 credits

This course is an intensive study of literature, theory, rhetoric, research, and writing. Topics vary and are chosen by the instructor. Topics may include, but are not limited to, Chaucer, Milton, The Spirit in Literature, Creation Stories, and Faces of Evil. Students may repeat the course provided they enroll in different topics. Prerequisite: ENG 339.

ENG 465. Internship 3-6 credits

On-the-job experience in either an on-campus or off-campus site. Specific internship duties are determined in contractual agreement among the student, the on-site supervisor, and the department internship coordinator. All interns write a proposal, keep a journal of their work experiences, meet regularly with the coordinator, write a final report, and give a public presentation above their internship experiences. Academic credit is three semester credits for 12 hours of work each week or six semester credits for 24 hours of work each week; all internships run 14 weeks. Prerequisites: attendance at three final report meetings prior to time of application, approval of department internship selection committee, approval of the on-site supervisor, a 2.5 grade point average, and junior or senior standing. Graded credit.

ENG 475. Advanced Faith and Learning Integration 3 credits

In the spirit of the mission of Waynesburg University, this course intends to provide junior and senior level students with an unparalleled opportunity to integrate the Bible materials and its history of interpretation to the academic disciplines. Students who wish to engage in this level of theological reflection on vocation should consult with both their academic advisors and with the Chair of the Biblical and Ministry Studies Major Program. See page 116 for further information. This course will not substitute for senior capstone/research courses required in the majors. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing; three credits in BMS courses; 3.0 minimum grade point average. (Offered when departmental resources permit.)

ENG 495. Special Topics in Literature or Creative Writing 3 credits

A study of various particular topics – including individual authors, works, genres, themes –chosen by the members of the department in consultation with students. The topic will usually be different for each semester. This course, when offered as Special Topics in Literature, meets the literature course requirement of the General Education curriculum. Prerequisite: ENG 185 or permission of Department Chair. (Offered when departmental resources permit)

ENG 497. Independent Studies 1-3 credits

A carefully guided study of selected readings, usually with a definite thematic, historical, biographical, aesthetic, or philosophical connection, or a carefully guided writing, editing, or communications project. The course is open to sophomore, junior, and senior English majors with the approval of their advisor. The course is also open to non-majors with the approval of the English department chair and their major advisors.

ENG 499. Portfolio Review 1 credit

Under supervision of an appropriate faculty member, the student will create a portfolio of work accomplished within one's specific area of concentration. This portfolio will be reviewed and evaluated. Required of all English majors in second semester of the senior year.

Testimonials I was driven toward a degree in English by my love for language and writing. After I began taking classes and interacting with the faculty, that love quickly turned into a true passion. The challenges I have encountered in the classroom have allowed my writing to transform and grow, as well as encourage me to think beyond my own expectations.
Kayla Longstreth, senior English (creative writing) major