Fine Arts at Waynesburg University

The Waynesburg University Fine Arts Department is comprised of three central areas of study: Art, Music and Theatre. Each of these program areas is an active component of the Waynesburg collegiate experience. Regardless of their choice of degree program, all talented students may be a vital part of the art, music or theatre programs. High school seniors interested in auditioning for the Music Program can click on the button below to access our Music Program Audition Application.

Music Program Audition Application

Both campus community and area fine arts connoisseurs are invited to visit one or all of the events hosted by the Fine Arts Department throughout the year.

View the Fine Arts Calendar

Each Fine Arts area offers a concentration in Arts Administration. These programs utilize skilled instruction from other departments in the Waynesburg University family such as biblical and ministry studies, business and communication to name a few.

Spring 2017 Fine Arts Calendar

Facilities

The Waynesburg University Fine Arts Department offers a Mac Lab for students to produce superior sound for their musical pursuits. Specialized software, headphones and Apple computers enable music students to hear their work at the highest level of quality.

Programs Offered

Art Major

Studio arts taught at Waynesburg University include drawing, painting, photography, sculpture, ceramics, printmaking and design. These avenues of visual expression, as well as elective courses in graphic design, computer imaging and technical illustration, will help to prepare you for a studio career or for specialized study in graduate school.

You will explore the creative process, gain practical experience using the tools and techniques of the visual artist and develop an appreciation for artistic expression in a variety of cultures. As you explore your talent and abilities, you will also gain an important perspective concerning the role of the arts and artists in modern society through studio and art history courses. You’ll gain portfolio pieces and experience displaying your work in the Benedum Fine Arts Gallery.

Art Minor

As an art minor at Waynesburg University, you can hone your talent and abilities while gaining an important perspective through studio and art history courses. You will explore the creative process, gain practical experience using the tools and techniques of the visual artist and develop an appreciation for artistic expression in a variety of cultures. The minor requires 24 credits.

Arts Administration Major

The arts administration major will prepare you to work in cultural institutions, such as art museums and galleries, professional theatre, recording and sound production companies, opera and dance companies, symphony orchestras and regional or community arts organizations. It also prepares the student for graduate work in arts administration.

Students will gain the historical and aesthetic knowledge of the arts needed to work in the field as well as skills and insight in the areas of accounting, personnel management, public relations and general arts management. A sensitivity to the arts and understanding of the process involved in producing visual art, concerts, and plays will allow the graduate to collaborate effectively with artists, performers, directors, theatre technicians, and others working in arts-related positions.

The program is interdisciplinary, combining courses in business and communication with courses in one of three areas of concentration in the fine arts: art, music, or theatre. An internship is required and will be arranged collaboratively by the student and the department.

Music Concentration

Students following this degree path choose from a variety of areas in which to use their education. The myriad of career possibilities include the recording industry, front offices of symphony halls, public relations for bands and vocal groups, editing and promotions for publishing firms, as well as others. The classes offered in the music program at Waynesburg are in the areas of music history, music theory and applied music lessons and ensembles of all types. Students attend a nucleus of classes and lessons that allow them to be liberally versed in many areas of the music industry, and they are encouraged to seek out abundant practical educational opportunities, including performances, that are afforded them as a member of the music program on the Waynesburg University campus.

Theatre Concentration

As graduates of this major, students will be prepared for behind-the-scene careers in theatre, including house management, ticketing, membership, publicity and outreach. Courses in theatre, business and communication give students the background they need to be competitive when applying for theatre-related positions. Internships provide the opportunity for bringing together knowledge from the variety of disciplines required by the major. Students are required to participate in upcoming performances throughout the academic year, either behind the scenes or in front of the curtain.

Comedies, tragedies, dramas and musicals have all found their way to the stage of the Performing Arts Center with such productions as West Side Story, Macbeth, Lend Me a Tenor, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Frankenstein, You Can't Take It with You, Brigadoon, Annie Get Your Gun, Godspell, and Steel Magnolias, to name a few.

Visual Arts Concentration

As graduates of this major, students will be prepared for careers with galleries, museums and other arts organizations. Courses in art, business, and communication give students the background to be competitive when applying for positions in museum curating, community outreach, fundraising, public relations, exhibition installation, and other arts-related employment. Internships provide the opportunity for the student to bring together knowledge gained from the variety of disciplines required by the major.

Music Ministry Major

Since the time of Jesus, God’s people have used music to proclaim the Gospel and to nurture the discipleship of Christ’s followers. In this enduring tradition, you will be prepared to provide music leadership. To be adequately prepared for that, this option will demand your proficiencies in keyboard, conducting, music history and theory. Coursework will also include group and individual music instruction. For the Music Ministry Option, you will need 22 hours in keyboard proficiency, music history, theory, conducting, individual instruction and performance and group instruction and performance.

Within the music ministry major at Waynesburg University, students experience study in theory and applied music, music pedagogy and music history and appreciation. You can tailor your course of study to vocal or instrumental music.

Music Minor

As a music minor at Waynesburg University, you must declare a primary instrument or voice, prepare and present and audition on your instrument or voices, complete proficiency examinations, maintain membership in a large ensemble, pursue membership in at least one Chamber Ensemble, attend and perform on studio juries, attend and staff fine arts events, complete internship requirements and earn 23 specific credits within the music curriculum.

Theatre Minor

As a theatre minor at Waynesburg University, you will complete 19-21 credits in the subjects of theatre, acting for the stage, theatre history, directing for the stage and directed theatre activities including performances in musicals and other Waynesburg theatrical offerings.

Academic Curriculum

ART 101. Art to the Early Renaissance 3 credits

A study of the history of art beginning with prehistoric cave painting and concluding with Gothic art through the fourteenth century. The painting, sculpture, and architecture of the major Western cultures, such as Egyptian, Greek, Roman, Early Christian, Byzantine, and Islamic, are viewed and discussed. Emphasis is on art as a reflection of the culture and society that produced it. Fall

ART 102. Art from the Early Renaissance to the Present 3 credits

A study of the history of art beginning with Late Gothic and concluding with twentieth-century art. The painting, sculpture, and architecture of the major Western periods and movements, such as Renaissance, Baroque, Romanticism, Impressionism, Abstraction, and Expressionism, are viewed and discussed. Emphasis is on art as a reflection of the culture and society that produced it. Students enrolling in this course need not have taken ART 101. Spring

ART 106. Drawing 3 credits

A course in the fundamentals of drawing. A variety of both black and white and color media are used to draw from still life and other subjects. Class work and assignments are designed to develop visual perception, drawing skills, and personal expression.

ART 107. History of American Art 3 credits

The course content will address what is uniquely American about American art through an historical survey of the major developments in American painting, architecture, and sculpture from the Colonial Period into the modern times. Spring

ART 108. Women Artists 3 credits

A study of the lives and work of women artists from the Renaissance to the present. Special attention is given to the difficulties encountered by women artists in having their work recognized and shown. Emphasis is on art as a reflection of the individual artist’s culture and experience. (Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit.)

ART 109. World Art History and Studio 3 credits

This course provides a global view of selected Asian, African, Middle Eastern, and North and South American fine arts, decorative arts (textiles, ceramics, jewelry, etc.) and architecture. The course will use an historical approach in conjunction with an art production studio investigation of various cultures’ art styles, techniques and aesthetics. Spring

ART 115. Design for Art 3 credits

An introduction to the study of composition in visual art. A variety of black and white and color media are used to explore two- and three-dimensional design. A study of the elements of design (line, shape, color, value, etc.) and the principles of design (unity, movement, balance, etc.) will be used to investigate the role of composition in works of art. Students will be challenged to develop their technical skills and aesthetic sensitivity. Fall

ART 116. Painting-Watercolor 3 credits

A course in the fundamentals of painting with transparent media. A study of color theory and the properties of color will prepare students to paint from still life and a variety of other subjects. Class work and assignments are designed to develop painting skills while exploring realistic, abstract, and non-representational approaches to subject matter. Spring

ART 117. Sculpture † 3 credits

A course in the fundamentals of three-dimensional art. Clay is used to explore both the additive and subtractive approaches to sculpting, with an emphasis on personal expression and creative thought. Approaches to subject matter include realism, abstraction, and non-representation. Techniques for working with clay, such as slabbuilding, coil building, and modeling, are taught. Fall

ART 118. Ceramics † 3 credits

An introduction to clay and pottery making. Wheel-throwing as well as hand-building techniques, such as coil, slab, and pinch, are taught. Emphasis is on craftsmanship and creative thought. Students will glaze work they produce and be introduced to firing techniques.

ART 125. Printmaking † 3 credits

An introduction to printmaking techniques, such as relief printing, monotypes, intaglio, and silkscreen. The printmaking aesthetic is explored while relevant skills are developed. Fall

ART 126. Jewelry and Metals † 3 credits

A basic studio course in the designing and fabrication of jewelry and other metal objects. Processes such as sawing, piercing, forging repoussé and chasing, dapping, riveting, doming, casting, soldering and polishing are taught. Students will be introduced to copper enameling. Emphasis is on craftsmanship and creative thought.

ART 197. Art Exploratory 3 credits

An independent study from the areas of drawing, painting, ceramics, sculpture, or art history. The course is conducted by way of a contractual arrangement between the instructor and the student. Prerequisite: Approval of the department chair. (Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit.)

ART 215. Advanced Ceramics † 3 credits

Intensive study of either hand-building or wheel-throwing or both, according to the interests of the student. Each student will select a specified number of assignments from a menu of possibilities provided by the instructor. Prerequisite: ART 118. Spring

ART 217. Art in the Elementary School 3 credits

A course designed to develop an understanding of the need and purpose of art at the elementary school level. Students will learn techniques and methods used in teaching art. Studio experiences along with lecture, discussion, and written work will help students to understand ways children learn through meaningful art experiences. Co-requisite: EDU 105 or permission of the department chair. Spring

ART 475. Advanced Faith and Learning Integration 3 credits

In the spirit of the mission of Waynesburg University, this course intends to provide junior and senior level students with an unparalleled opportunity to integrate the Bible materials and its history of interpretation to the academic disciplines. Students who wish to engage in this level of theological reflection on vocation should consult with both their academic advisors and with the Chair of the Biblical and Ministry Studies Major Program. See page 116 for further information. This course will not substitute for senior capstone/research courses required in the majors. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing; three credits in BMS courses; 3.00 minimum grade point average. (Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit.)

ART 487. Honors Course 3 credits

Independent study in an area of specific interest to the student. The course is conducted by way of a contractual arrangement between the instructor and the student. Open only to junior and senior art majors or arts administration (visual arts option) majors with an art average of B or better. Prerequisite: Approval of the department chair. (Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit.)

ART 195, 295, 395, 495. Special Topics 3 credits

A course to address an area of particular interest to students and faculty members or the expertise of a visiting professor. Depending upon the content of the course, a lecture/discussion format, a project format, or a combination will be used. Not to be used for independent study purposes. (Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit.)

ART 499. Senior Art Exhibition 1 credit

A capstone experience in which the senior student majoring in either Art or Arts Administration (Visual Arts Option) will prepare an exhibition of his or her best work completed while a student at the University. The students will be responsible for installing the exhibition in the gallery and hosting an opening reception, to which the public and the college community are invited. In addition, the student will collaborate with the gallery manager in planning and promoting the exhibition.

AAD 205. Sound, Projection and Lighting 3 credits

An introductory study of the techniques involved in the operation of sound, projection and lighting for a variety of applications. Setting lights and sound for theatrical and musical productions will be a focus. The class will also deal with the purchase and maintenance of media equipment as well as the designing of media facilities including classroom, PA systems, multi-media and traveling media packages. (Spring of even numbered years)

AAD 465. Arts Administration Internship 6 credits

The internship provides practical on-the-job experience at an off-campus site. Specific internship duties are determined in contractual arrangement among the student, the onsite supervisor, and the department internship coordinator. All interns write a proposal, keep a journal of their work experiences, meet regularly with the coordinator, and write a final report. Academic credit is three semester credits for twelve hours of work each week or six semester credits for twenty-four hours of work each week; all internships run fourteen weeks. Prerequisites: approval of the department internship coordinator, approval of the on-site supervisor, a 2.50 gradepoint average, and senior standing. Graded credit.

AAD 195, 295, 395, 495. Special Topics 3 credits

MUS 101. Survey of Music 3 credits

This course provides an introductory study of standard concert music. By means of analyses of Western art music works, attendance and response to live performances, and classroom discussions, students will become familiar with a representative repertoire of what is commonly called “classical music.” Students will develop practical and critical techniques for analyzing musical works from the ancient world to the twentieth century.

MUS 106. Survey of World Music 3 credits

This course provides an introductory study of traditional music from around the globe which is outside the scope of the European art tradition. It is an approach to the study of any music, not only in terms of the music itself but also in its relation to its cultural context; in other words, all music being used by the people of a given area. Spring

MUS 107. Survey of American Popular Music 3 credits

This course provides an introductory study of music that has shaped mainstream American culture, including folk, blues, jazz, gospel, tejano, salsa, cajun, zydeco, and other popular music genres. This course adopts the American cultures perspective by providing students with the intellectual tools to better understand and appreciate the multicultural complexity of American music. Spring

MUS 108. Survey of Music in Worship 3 credits

This course examines the history of music in worship from Biblical times to the present. Sacred music is the specific focus of this course, including an in-depth study of sacred art music, and survey information concerning hymnology and spiritual songs. Fall

MUS 111. Applied Music: Group Beginner Instruction 1 credit

This is an instructional course designed for students with little to no musical experience. Students will meet in small groups and be introduced to vocal/ instrumental exercises and techniques, and basic notational reading skills. This course may include sections for beginning voice, guitar, piano, basic musicianship, and jazz improvisation. Students who pass MUS 111 should proceed to MUS 112.

MUS 112-212-312-412. Applied Music: Individual Instruction † 1 credit

This is individual instrumental instruction and includes lecture, exercises, sight reading, and repertoire. Students choose from specific instruments such as guitar, piano, voice, percussion, brass, woodwinds, double reeds and upright/electric bass. Course level is determined by student skill. Students with little to no experience in music are encouraged to begin with MUS 111. May be repeated for credit. Students are not permitted to take these courses as an audit.

MUS 115. Applied Music: Class Piano 1-1 credit

This course is offered for Music Ministry majors, Arts Administration (Music Concentration) majors, and Music minors who are beginning their keyboard skills studies. Students will learn and refine the basics of piano technique, as they master basic skills chosen to maximize keyboard proficiencies. Students will be coached on practice strategies, sight reading, technique, style, accuracy, fluency, and musicianship. This course provides study of keyboard skills that are necessary to lead to further individual study in applied piano. Students who have declared piano as their major instrument are given the opportunity to test out of this course and proceed to individual applied piano instruction. Arts Administration (Music concentration) majors, Music Ministry majors, and music minor students are required to complete 2 semesters of this course.

MUS 119. Music in the Elementary School 3 credits

Exploring music education methods and media for teaching in the elementary grades, including preschool. Involves lectures, demonstrations, discussion and practical application of techniques in creativity, rhythm, singing, and instruments. (This course will be replaced by ECE 105: Creative Arts in Early Childhood Education) Spring

MUS 121-221-321-421. Applied Music: Group Instrumental Instruction 1 credit

This course covers Symphonic Band and Chamber Works instrumental ensembles, including quartets, quintets and other combinations. Specific instrumentation of ensembles may vary based upon student demand. Interested students should consult the Music Program Director before signing up for Chamber Work ensembles.

MUS 122-222-322-422. Applied Music: Group Vocal Instruction 1 credit

This course includes the Lamplighters and Chamber Works vocal ensembles, including quartets, quintets and other combinations. Specific combinations of vocalists may vary based upon student demand. Interested students should consult the Music Program Director before signing up for Chamber Work ensembles.

MUS 131. Music Theory I 3 credits

The intent of this course is to evaluate each student’s entry level of competency in basic music theory and to provide ample opportunities for each student’s growth in the areas of musical reading and composition. This first semester covers music fundamentals including elements of pitch and rhythm, and an introduction to diatonic chords and basic part writing. Fall

MUS 132. Music Theory II 3 credits

This second semester study of music theory continues with part writing using nonchord tones and diatonic seventh chords. This detailed study of the written forms of music, including the notational and compositional techniques of tonal harmony, will increase each student’s aural proficiency and understanding of music as a language. Prerequisite: MUS 131. Spring

MUS 231. Music Theory III 3 credits

This course is a continued study of the written forms of music in the tonal harmony tradition. This course begins with the use of chromaticism and further elements of harmonic vocabulary. It also introduces the techniques used in the tonal harmony of the late nineteenth century and modern compositional techniques of the twentieth century. Prerequisite: MUS 132. (Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit.)

MUS 241. Aural Techniques I 3 credits

The principle objective of this course is to acquire the skill of sight singing (the ability to sing a given melody accurately at first sight). Class meetings will cover the following skill areas: interval recognition and intervallic relationships, solmization, use of Kodaly hand signals, sight singing, and beginning tonal dictation. Students will demonstrate proficiency at the end of the semester by sight singing unfamiliar musical excerpts, identifying melodic and harmonic intervals, mastering Kodaly hand signals, and taking beginning tonal dictations. (Fall of odd numbered years)

MUS 242. Aural Techniques II 3 credits

The principle objective of this course is to continue to improve the skill of sight singing, interval recognition and dictation abilities Class meetings will cover the following skill areas: intervals recognition, use of Kodaly hand signals, sight singing, and tonal and rhythmic dictation. Pre-requisite: MUS 241. (Spring of even numbered years)

MUS 245. Introduction to Conducting 3 credits

This course provides an overview of basic conducting techniques. Emphasis is placed on fundamental beat patterns and non-verbal communication. Basics of score preparation and rehearsal techniques will also be included. Repertoire for a variety of instrumental and vocal ensembles will be addressed. Prerequisite: MUS 131-132, or 241-242. (Spring of odd numbered years)

MUS 301. Music History I: Ancient through Baroque 3 credits

This is an in-depth study of music from the European art tradition. The intent is to bring the student in contact with an understanding of western musical styles from Antiquity through 1750, to present tools of analysis and possibilities for student use of those tools in their consideration of musical styles, to create powerful listening skills for the music major or minor. (Fall of even numbered years)

MUS 302. Music History II: Classical through 20th Century 3 credits

This is an in-depth study of music from the European art tradition. The intent is to bring the student in contact with an understanding of western musical styles from 1750 to present day, to present tools of analysis and possibilities for student use of those tools in their consideration of musical styles, to create powerful listening skills for the music major or minor. (Spring of odd numbered years)

MUS 195, 295, 395, 495. Special Topics 3 credits

MUS 499. Senior Recital 1 credit

A capstone experience in which the senior student majoring in either Music Ministry or Arts Administration (Music Concentration) will prepare a recital of his or her best work completed while a student at Waynesburg University. The completion of four semesters in the lower division applied individual studio instruction classes is required for enrollment in Senior Recital. In addition, each applicant must be approved by the faculty hearing his/her performance examination at the end of the fourth semester, and also by his/her private instructor before being allowed to register for study at the junior or senior level. Bachelor of Arts majors must earn a grade of B or better to pass. Prerequisite: Consent of applied studio instructor and department chair. Co-requisite: Enrollment in upper level private instruction in pertinent studio.

THE 105. Introduction to Theatre (Lecture course) 3 credits

An introduction to the elements and experience of live theatre and representative genres of dramatic literature. Lab hours, which may involve attending, acting in, or ushering for a live theatre production or assisting with construction, box office, or stage crew for a campus production are required as an introduction to the experience of theatre.

THE 107. Church Drama: Performance 1 credit

This course will develop a troupe of traveling players, THE KING’S COURT, who will present a variety of scenes, monologues, and readings for churches, community groups, schools, and college functions. The main focus of THE KNIGHT’S COURT is to communicate the Christian message through drama. Students will be expected to participate in on- and off-campus performances. This course DOES NOT fulfill the General Education requirements for a religion course. May be repeated up to 3 credits. (Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit.)

THE 201. Acting for the Stage I 3 credits

Studio course in which students will explore the process of acting. Rehearsal techniques of improvisation, physical and vocal development and expression, and character analysis will be examined through scene work and classroom performance of dramatic texts. (Fall of even numbered years)

THE 202. Acting for the Stage II 3 credits

Studio course in which students will learn techniques of script analysis and character development through written work and classroom performance of dramatic texts. Prerequisite: THE 201 or the department chair’s permission. (Spring of odd numbered years)

THE 208. Musical Theatre History 3 credits

Survey of the history and evolution of musical theatre through identification and discussion of landmark productions and artists that have influenced its development. The relationship among libretto, score, and lyrics will be examined using examples of 20th-century American and British musicals. (Spring of even numbered years)

THE 215. Theatre History I 3 credits

Survey of the theory and drama that have defined history from the Greeks to the 18th century. The evolution of theatre technology and architecture, conventions, and literature from these periods will be examined as well as a study of the relationship between theatre and the social and aesthetic values of its time. (Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit.)

THE 216. Theatre History II 3 credits

Survey of the theory and drama that have defined history from the 18th century to the present. The evolution of theatre technology and architecture, conventions, and literature from these periods will be examined as well as a study of the relationship between theatre and the social and aesthetic values of its time. (Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit.)

THE 250. Liturgical Drama 3 credits

This lecture/performance course examines the Bible and other works as drama and dramatic literature. It discusses many characters and stories found in the Bible from a dramatic and theatrical perspective. The course also examines the worship service, looking at the avenue that Theatre can take in enhancing the worship experience. This course DOES NOT fulfill the General Education requirements for literature or religion courses. (Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit.)

THE 297. Directed Theatre Activities 1-3 credits

Students will independently explore specific challenges of an advanced nature in playwriting, acting, design, and management. In conjunction with production work, students will solve problems associated with the area of concentration. May be taken for a maximum of three credits. Prior work on campus productions and department chair permission required.

THE 305. Directing for the Stage 3 credits

Studio course in which students will explore the process of directing. Script analysis, staging and actor coaching techniques, and planning and organization strategies will be examined using a case-study script. Students will prepare a scene for classroom performance. (Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit.)

THE 307. Playwriting 3 credits

Theory and practice of the playwright’s craft with a particular emphasis on play analysis. Aristotle’s elements of drama will be used as the student works through the premise, the scenario, the dialogue, and the drafts. (Fall of odd numbered years)

THE 366. The History of Film (cross-listed as COM 336) 3 credits

A survey of the development of film from the early twentieth century through the 1960s this course provides an understanding of cinematic form through the international survey of acknowledged classics of the past. This course meets the film requirement in the General Education curriculum and serves as 3 credits toward the Theatre Minor. (Fall of even numbered years)

THE 195, 295, 395. Special Topics in Theatre 3 credits

A study of particular topics important to the theatre. These include various genres of drama and areas of interest in technical theatre, performance, production, and management. The course may be taken once for the minor, but it may be taken as often as the student’s schedule permits. (Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit.)

Fine Arts

Xela Batchelder

Chairperson of the Fine Arts Department-Assistant Professor of Arts Administration


Fine Arts
Andrew Heisey

Assistant Professor of Art


Fine Arts
Melanie Catana

Director of Choral Music - Instructor of Vocal Music


Fine Arts
Ronda DePriest

Professor of Instrumental Music - Director of the Music Program


Fine Arts

Waynesburg’s Department of Fine Arts has given me every opportunity to grow in my musicianship through many different types of musical ensembles and theatre opportunities. Whether a student is in one ensemble, or many, the experience is second to none. The faculty members are dedicated to helping each student grow not only in fine arts, but in their everyday life.
Tiffany Franck, Class of 2014

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