Mathematics and Computer Science at Waynesburg University

Waynesburg University provides a strong foundation of modern theory and skills to prepare you for the fast-changing, technology-driven fields of mathematics and computer science. Our program gives you a solid foundation in theoretical and applied mathematics, providing skills necessary for a successful and productive career in a variety of settings.

As a computer science major, you will be prepared for a profession in computers and technology by not only receiving the technological skills, but also the communication skills and ethics needed to succeed. You will receive knowledge in a broad-based coverage of technical areas, choosing to study from a variety of options including computer science, business information science and information technology.

Programs Offered

Mathematics Major

The mathematics major at Waynesburg University provides a solid foundation in theoretical and applied mathematics, providing skills necessary for a successful and productive career in a variety of settings. Career options include management in engineering and the natural sciences, accounting, astronomy, meteorology, data processing, economics and environmental planning, to name a few. The mathematics major is also great preparation for graduate study in the mathematical sciences.

You may wish to combine your mathematics degree with a major or minor in another field.

  • Degrees in math and biology are excellent preparation for a career in biostatistics, epidemiology and public health research.
  • Degrees in math and political science form a great pre-law curriculum.
  • Majoring in math and computer science will give you a solid foundation for a career as a computer analyst, programmer, software developer or systems engineer.

Mathematics Major with a Secondary Education Option

If you wish to pursue a career in the teaching of math at the secondary education level, you will want to join the outstanding teacher tradition of Waynesburg University. The Waynesburg math curriculum meets the requirements for certification by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. As part of the course work, students visit various mathematics classes in area junior and senior high schools. You also participate in a practicum by teaching math to peers in preparation for the student teaching experience.

Mathematics Minor

Students interested in completing a minor in mathematics along with a major in another related area need to complete 32 credits within the mathematics program at Waynesburg University

Business Information Science Major

The business information science major at Waynesburg University is designed for students who would like to use their technological skills in a business or corporate environment, or who wish to go into management at a high-tech company. This major combines computer science courses with business courses, such as accounting, marketing and finance to give you the edge you will need to succeed.

Computer Science Major

This major is designed for students who want to work with computers in a science setting, or who plan to go on to graduate school to study the design of computers, engineering and programming algorithms. The computer science major at Waynesburg University combines computer science courses with higher level mathematics courses to give you a firm basis not only in the applications of computer technology but also the theory behind those applications.

Computer Science Minor

Students interested in completing a minor in computer science along with a major in another related area need to complete 31 credits within the computer science program at Waynesburg University.

Information Technology Major

This major is designed for students who want the broadest knowledge possible in the area of technological applications. This major combines computer science courses with communication courses in the area of graphic design. You will study computer graphics, Web design, digital illustration and multimedia together with the standard computer science courses so that you will be well prepared for a career as a Webmaster, graphic designer or Web site designer.

Computer Security and Forensics Major

The computer security and forensics major at Waynesburg University combines criminal justice studies, computer sciences and computer forensics. Students learn the latest theories and gain the knowledge necessary to handle forensic investigations involving digital devices and electronic crime.

Mathmatics Course Offerings

MAT 105. Basic Concepts 3 credits

A course that covers addition, subtraction, multiplication and the division of fractions and decimals; working with positive and negative numbers; percentages, ratios, and rates. The course utilizes these skills by introducing some practical word problems in each section. An introduction to algebra will also be covered. This course does not satisfy the general education requirement for quantitative reasoning skills.

MAT 106. Beginning Algebra 3 credits

This is an introductory course in algebra. Students will learn the basic concepts and applications of algebra. The course will cover real numbers and variables, solving equation and inequalities, solving applied problems, exponents and polynomials, factoring, and graphing. This course does not count toward any program within the mathematics and computer science department. Prerequisite: MAT 105 (or equivalent).

MAT 107. Practical Mathematics for Everyday Life 3 credits

(formerly MAT 107, Quantitative Analysis – 2010 WU catalog) This course will familiarize students with the scope of mathematical applications in the various disciplines. Concepts and understanding of the applications of elementary set theory, the real number system, probability and statistics, elementary algebra, and consumer mathematics will be emphasized. This course is designed primarily for those students not majoring in mathematics or the sciences. Prerequisite: MAT 105 (or equivalent). Spring

MAT 108. Intermediate Algebra 3 credits

A course in intermediate algebra for students with inadequate preparation for Mathematics 205. Not counted toward any program within the Mathematics Department. Prerequisite: MAT 106 (or equivalent).

MAT 204. Mathematics for Middle/Junior High School 3 credits

An elective course for those students interested in teaching in the middle or junior high schools. Topics include relating fractions and decimals to percents, mixed numbers, scientific notation, and selected areas of algebra, geometry, probability and statistics. Prerequisite: MAT 106 (or equivalent). (Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit.)

MAT 205. Functions and Trigonometry 3 credits

(formerly MAT 205, Elementary Functions – 2010 WU Catalog) A study of elementary functions, their graphs and applications, including polynomial, algebraic, rational, exponential, and trigonometric functions. Prerequisite: MAT 108 (or equivalent).

MAT 211. Calculus I 4 credits

Limits and continuity, derivatives and integrals of algebraic, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; relevant analytic geometry and applications. Prerequisite: MAT 205 (or equivalent).

MAT 212. Calculus II 4 credits

A continuation of MAT 211. Techniques of integration are stressed. Prerequisite: MAT 211.

MAT 213. Calculus III 3 credits

Limits and continuity; infinite series; indeterminate forms; geometry, derivatives, and integration associated with functions of several variables. Prerequisite: MAT 212. Spring

MAT 215. Applied Statistics 3 credits

(formerly MAT 215, Elementary Statistics – 2010 WU catalog) Descriptive statistics, introduction to inferential statistics, applications. Prerequisite: MAT 106.

MAT 216. Statics for Engineers 3 credits

(formerly MAT 216, Statics – 2010 WU Catalog) Principles of mechanics, force systems, static equilibrium, structures, analysis of frames and trusses, distributed forces, friction, centroids, and moments of inertia. This course is required of all 3-2 engineering (mathematics major) program participants. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (Fall 2013 and alternate years)

MAT 217. Applied Discrete Mathematics 3 credits

Set theory, prepositional logic, Boolean algebra, recurrence relations, combinatorics, matrix algebra, analysis of algorithms, graphs and trees. Prerequisite: MAT 205. Fall

MAT 218. Applied Linear Algebra 3 credits

Linear equations and matrices, vector spaces, linear mappings, determinants, quadratic forms. Spring

MAT 308. Geometry 3 credits

Projective, Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry, and emphasis on the analytic approach. Prerequisite: MAT 217. (Spring 2014 and alternate years)

MAT 315. Introduction to Mathematical Statistics 3 credits

A study of discrete and continuous sample spaces, probability laws, conditional probability, independence, density and distribution functions, mathematical expectation, joint distributions, and the central limit theorem. Prerequisite: MAT 215. Co-requisite: MAT-213. Spring

MAT 316. Vector Calculus 3 credits

A study of the calculus of vector-valued functions including divergence and curl, line integrals, Green's Theorem, Stokes' Theorem and surface integration. Selected applications include statics of particles, equilibrium of rigid bodies and analysis of structures. Co-requisite: MAT 218. Prerequisite: MAT 212. (Fall 2013 and alternate years)

MAT 317. Operations Research 3 credits

A study of linear programming, duality theory and sensitivity analysis, network analysis, dynamic programming, decision theory, game theory, and queuing theory. Prerequisites: MAT 215 and MAT 218. (Fall 2014 and alternate years)

MAT 365. Internship (cross-listed as CSC 365) 1-3 credits

On-the-job experience either on or off-campus. Specific internship duties are negotiated among the student, the on-site supervisor, and the department course instructor. Interns keep journals of their work experiences and time spent on the job, meet regularly with their instructor, and write a final report of their work experience as it relates to their liberal arts education. The final report must also relate the student's work experience to the General Education Goals of the University including those goals that address Judeo-Christian values and traditions. Credits will be awarded as agreed to by the parties involved, following the general rule of approximately thirty hours of on-site effort per hour of credit received. This course may be taken two times for a total of up to 6 hours of credit. Graded credit.

MAT 395. Special Topics 1-3 credits

A study of various particular topics which are chosen by the members of the department in consultation with students. Depending upon the particular topics offered, one, two, or three credits may be given. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. (Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit.)

MAT 397. Seminar 1 credit

Assigned readings, discussions, oral and written reports on subjects of general mathematical interest and value. A maximum of two credits from this sequence may be counted toward the mathematics major. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

MAT 406. Differential Equations 3 credits

Methods of solution and applications of ordinary differential equations, introduction to partial differential equations. Prerequisite: MAT 212. (Fall 2014 and alternate years)

MAT 407. Numerical Analysis 3 credits

Solution of equations, polynomial approximations, numerical integration and differentiation, matrices, differential equations, development of related computer programs. Prerequisite: MAT 212 and MAT 218. (Fall 2013 and alternate years)

MAT 409. Number Theory 3 credits

A study of properties of the integers. Concepts include factorization, prime numbers, congruences, Diophantine equations, Fermat's and Wilson's theorems, Euler's function, and quadratic reciprocity. Stress will be on the nature of proof. Prerequisites: MAT 217. (Spring 2015 and alternate years)

MAT 415. Introduction to Real Analysis 3 credits

A study of sequences, convergence, limits, continuity, derivatives and differentials, definite integrals, multiple integrals, sequences, and series of functions. Prerequisites: MAT 212 and MAT 217. (Spring 2015 and alternate years)

MAT 416. Modern Algebra 3 credits

A study of groups, rings, fields, and integral domains. Prerequisites: MAT 217. (Spring 2014 and alternate years)

MAT 475. Advanced Faith and Learning Integration 3 credits

In the spirit of the mission of Waynesburg University, this course intends to provide junior and senior level students with an unparalleled opportunity to integrate the Bible materials and its history of interpretation to the academic disciplines. Students who wish to engage in this level of theological reflection on vocation should consult with both their academic advisors and with the Chair of the Biblical and Ministry Studies Major Program. See page 116 for further information. This course will not substitute for senior capstone/research courses required in the majors. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing; three credits in BMS courses; 3.0 minimum grade point average. (Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit.)

MAT 497. Independent Study 1-3 credits

Independent study and research into specific topics and problems in the field of mathematics. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

MAT 499. Senior Project (cross-listed as CSC 499) 1-3 credits

This course requires a literature, including Web, search and written paper on a selected topic in mathematics. The student and coordinating instructor will agree upon the topic. Upon completion, the project will be briefed to the department faculty and a written report will be submitted.

Computer Science Course Offerings

CSC 105. Introduction to Computers 3 credits

A course designed to help students become literate in the terminology and usage of computers. It covers a description of the hardware and software of a computer system, a brief history of computers, and the following topics on the personal computer: Windows, disk file management, word processing, and electronic spreadsheet. Other computer applications may be covered at the discretion of the instructor.

CSC 106. Survey of Computer Science 1 credit

This course will cover general aspects of computer science, including job descriptions, course descriptions and relations between the two. It will also cover algorithmic problem solving techniques, with an introduction to the basics of software development and engineering. Fall

CSC 116. Computer Programming I 3 credits

An introduction to the basic components of computer programming, using Java. Emphasis is placed on problem solving and structured design. The five basic programming elements of sequence, selection, repetition, methods, and arrays are stressed. Graphic components are also covered. Prerequisite: MAT 108 or any higher level math course

CSC 117. Computer Programming II 3 credits

Advanced programming in Java. Emphasis is placed on object-oriented design methodology. Topics include: classes, objects, methods, inheritance, exceptions handling, streams, file I/O, dynamic memory allocation, graphic components, and events driven programming. Prerequisite: CSC 116.

CSC 119. Computer Hardware and Architecture 4 credits

A study of structured computer organization. Topics include the history of computer architecture, digital logic, microcomputer architecture, instruction sets and parallel computer architecture. Also included is a hands-on study of the basic hardware operation of PCs including memory, expansion, upgrades, troubleshooting and performance. Fall (This course cannot be used to fulfill the General Education requirements for the Natural and Physical Sciences.)

CSC 206. Computer Organization and Assembly Language 3 credits

A study of the organization and operation of computer systems including addressing techniques, data representation, program control and I/O and assembly language programming. Prerequisite: CSC 117. (Fall 2014 and alternate years)

CSC 207. Data Structures 3 credits

Advanced programming and algorithm design using arrays, linked-lists, stacks, queues, trees, lists, searching and sorting. Also includes the implementation, use and reuse of abstract data types. Prerequisite: CSC 117. Spring

CSC 208. Database Management 3 credits

This course introduces the design, use, and application of database management systems. Topics include the relational data model, design theory, conceptual data design and modeling, and relational query languages for relational database design. Projects will provide practical experience in development and implementation. Prerequisite: CSC 117. Fall

CSC 217. Computers and Ethics in Society 1 credits

Seminar designed to explore the impact of computers on society. The class will discuss contemporary technical issues and personal ethics and experiences from a variety of viewpoints: social, legal, political, constitutional, economic, and Judeo-Christian. Students will develop their own professional ethics guidelines. Spring

CSC 226. Programming in C and C++ 3 credits

This course covers the constructions, syntax, and semantics of the programming languages C and C++. Both of these languages are widely used in computer science, mathematics, engineering and operating systems. This course is for those students who already have knowledge of the fundamentals of computer programming. The course will build on those fundamentals in the development of extended problem solving using the C and C++ languages. Prerequisite: CSC 116. (Fall 2013 and alternate years)

CSC 309. Operating Systems and Computer Architecture 3 credits

This course provides an understanding of the basic components of a general-purpose operating system. Topics include memory management, processes, process management, synchronization, concurrency, input/ output devices, resource allocation, and an introduction to file systems. Prerequisite: CSC 207. (Fall 2013 and alternate years)

CSC 316. Systems Analysis and Design 3 credits

Program and system design including choice of hardware and software, data design, input and output user specifications and management of resources. Documentation is stressed in all phases of design. Includes a team project to analyze and design specific system for an organization possibly in the local community. Prerequisite: CSC 117. (Spring 2015 and alternate years)

CSC 318. Software Design and Development 3 credits

Study of the software life cycle, programming, algorithms and design, project management with an emphasis on a structured approach to software development. Prerequisites: CSC207, CSC 326. (Fall 2013 and alternate years)

CSC 319. Computer Networks 4 credits

A study of the fundamentals of computer networks, addressing topics such as various hardware and software components, network and Internet protocols, design topologies, and the essentials of managing a network. Students will gain hands-on experience in setting up and configuring peer -to-peer and client/server networks. Prerequisite: CSC 119. (Spring 2015 and alternate years) (This course cannot be used to fulfill the General Education requirements for the Natural and Physical Sciences.)

CSC 325. Analysis of Algorithms 3 credits

A study of algorithms, their design, construction and efficiency. Topics will include the study of algorithms for searching, selection, sorting, recursion, hashing, and graph algorithms. Computational complexity and completeness will also be discussed. Prerequisite: CSC207. (Spring 2014 and alternate years)

CSC 326. Programming for the Internet 3 credits

This course will cover the programming aspects involved in the design, implementation and interfacing of Web pages. Topics will include XHTML, style sheets, Java Script, Dynamical HTML, Web servers, SQL Server, PHP and other current web programming tools and languages. Prerequisites: CSC 117, CSC208. (Spring 2015 and alternate years)

CSC 365. Internship (cross-listed as MAT 365) 1-3 credits

On-the-job experience either on or off-campus. Specific internship duties are negotiated among the student, the on-site supervisor, and the department course instructor. Interns keep journals of their work experiences and time spent on the job, meet regularly with their instructor, and write a final report of their work experience as it relates to their liberal arts education. The final report must also relate the student’s work experience to the General Education Goals of the University including those goals that address Judeo-Christian values and traditions. Credits will be awarded as agreed to by the parties involved, following the general rule of approximately thirty hours of on-site effort per hour of credit received. This course may be taken two times for a total of up to 6 hours of credit. Graded credit.

CSC 395. Selected Topics in Computer Science 1-3 credits

A study of particular topics of computer science chosen by the members of the department with consultation of the students. A formal classroom setting is used. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. (Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit.)

CSC 397. Independent Study 1-3 credits

Independent study and research in a specific field of interest to the student. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

CSC 406. Formal Language and Automata 3 credits

Introduction to formal languages and their relation to automata. Topics will include normal forms, classes of grammars and recognition of languages by automata. Turing machines and computational complexity will also be discussed. Prerequisite: CSC 207 or MAT 217. (Spring 2014 and alternate years)

CSC 407. Artificial Intelligence 3 credits

Knowledge representation and natural language processing, search algorithms, design and application of computer systems to problems in areas such as medicine and science. Expert systems. Prerequisite: CSC 117. (Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit.)

CSC 408. Theory of Programming Languages 3 credits

Comparison of several languages. Among the topics are syntactic and semantic design, data types and structures, control structures, program logic, parsing, symbol tables, scanning, object oriented languages. Prerequisite: CSC 207 or CSC 208. (Fall 2014 and alternate years)

CSC 409. Computer Security 3 credits

An examination of computer security and data retrieval. The course will consider topics and hands-on experience in security vulnerability, public key cryptology, firewalls, computer viruses and retrieval of lost and/or corrupted data. Prerequisites: CSC 119 and 319. (Spring 2014 and alternate years)

CSC 415. Computer Forensics 4 credits

A guide to computer forensics and investigation that presents methods to properly conduct a computer forensics investigation, beginning with a discussion of ethics while mapping to the objectives of the International Association of Computer Investigative Specialists (IACIS) certification. Prerequisites: CSC 117. (Spring 2014 and alternate years) (This course cannot be used to fulfill the General Education requirements for the Natural and Physical Sciences.)

CSC 475. Advanced Faith and Learning Integration 3 credits

In the spirit of the mission of Waynesburg University, this course intends to provide junior and senior level students with an unparalleled opportunity to integrate the Bible materials and its history of interpretation to the academic disciplines. Students who wish to engage in this level of theological reflection on vocation should consult with both their academic advisors and with the Chair of the Biblical and Ministry Studies Major Program. See page 116 for further information. This course will not substitute for senior capstone/research courses required in the majors. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing; three credits in BMS courses; 3.0 minimum grade point average. (Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit.)

CSC 499. Senior Project (cross-listed as MAT 499) 1-3 credits

This course requires research of current literature and a written paper on a selected topic in computer science. The student meets each week with the coordinating instructor regarding research progress, the topic, the outline, the draft, etc. Upon completion, the project will be presented to the department faculty and a final paper will be submitted.

Physics Course Offerings

PHY 105. Basic Physics 3 credits

An algebra-based introductory physics course that covers the subjects of motion, forces, momentum and energy, gravity, and electricity and magnetism. Three hours of lecture each week. Prerequisite: MAT 106 or equivalent. Spring

PHY 115. Introduction to Astronomy and Cosmology 4 credits

A survey in astronomy for non-science majors, covering the study of the solar system, stars, galaxies, origin and evolution of the Universe, and basic theories and methods of modern astronomy. The laboratory component focuses on experiments with computer-based simulations of astronomical phenomena. Three one-hour lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisites: Prior or concurrent enrollment in MAT 106. (Fall 2013 and alternate years)

PHY 201-202. Introductory Physics I-II 4-4 credits

A pre-calculus-based introductory physics course sequence, intended for students in the life sciences, that covers the subjects of kinematics, dynamics, statics, fluids, waves, heat, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, and optics. Two one-hour lectures, a one-hour recitation, and a two-hour lab period each week. MAT 205 is a prerequisite for PHY 201 and PHY 201 is a prerequisite for PHY 202. Fall-Spring

PHY 211-212. General Physics I-II 4-4 credits

A calculus-based introductory physics course sequence, intended for students in the physical sciences and engineering, that covers the subjects of motion kinematics, dynamics, electricity and magnetism. Two one-hour lectures, a one-hour recitation, and a two-hour lab period each week. MAT 212 is a co-requisite for PHY 211 and PHY 211 is a prerequisite for PHY 212. Fall-Spring

PHY 303. Modern Physics 3 credits

Introduction to relativity and quantum theory, and their applications to atomic, statistical, solid state, nuclear, and particle physics. Three one-hour lectures each week. Prerequisites: PHY 202 and consent of the instructor or PHY 212. (Fall 2013 and alternate years)

PHY 305. Electronic Circuits and Instrumentation 4 credits

Introduction to basic principles and techniques of electronics, covering DC and AC circuits, basic electronic components, transducers, linear and non-linear operation of operational amplifiers, logic gates, flip-flops, counters, memory, A/D and D/A conversion. The course is designed primarily for the 3-2 engineering students, to provide them with the required skills in electric circuits. The course is also open to any student with strong skills in basic physics and calculus, interested in a survey course in electronics. The laboratory component of the course involves hands-on experiments with the devices studied and their applications, along with projects that explore their combinations. Three hours of lecture, and one two-hour laboratory period per week. NOTE: This course does not satisfy the general education requirement for natural and physical sciences. Prerequisites: PHY 202, 212 or consent of the instructor. (Fall 2014 and alternate years)

PHY 312. Instrumental Methods for Forensic Science 4 credits

(Cross-listed as CHE 312 and FSC 312)
Theory and practice of modern analytical techniques emphasizing spectrophotometric, chromatographic, and electrochemical methods for Forensic Science. Second semester. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory period each week. Prerequisite: CHE 311, PHY 202. Spring

PHY 397. Independent Study 1-3 credits

Independent study and research into specific topics and problems in physics. Prerequisite: PHY 202 or 212 and consent of the instructor.

Testimonials The professors in the Mathematics Program at Waynesburg University have been a strong resource throughout my undergraduate studies. The faculty has taken a personal interest in my education and future success, and they have provided me with the education and insight on academic topics that have helped to create opportunities to grow within the field.
Daniel Piett, 2012 mathematics alumnus

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