Social Sciences at Waynesburg University

Social Sciences at Waynesburg University provide you with the knowledge and the hands-on experience to prepare you for a promising vocational field. Upon completion of any major within the program, you may be employed in a variety of settings including social work, mental health, substance abuse, aging/gerontology, domestic violence, youth services, childcare, corrections/criminal justice, education/schools, health care, recreation/fitness and vocational rehabilitation.

Completion of this program is also appropriate preparation for graduate work in human services, social work, counseling, criminal justice, sociology, human resources and law. Waynesburg University's historic emphasis on community service programs and the study of public policy provides an arena for meaningful dialogue about the direction of society. Such topics as the American family, urban sociology, criminology and religion in America are examined in depth in the classroom, while co-curricular opportunities for service help to deepen your understanding of social realities, challenges and opportunities.

Programs Offered

Human Services

Human Service Major, Bachelor of Science

The Waynesburg University Human Services major offers a comprehensive, multi-disciplinary program that provides our graduates with opportunities to compete effectively in a competitive job market. Students who earn a Bachelor of Science degree in human services study science courses including anatomy, physiology, microbiology, nutrition and more. They complete an additional 48 credits from a variety of departments to round out the sciences.

Human Services Major, Bachelor of Arts (Education Option)

As a human services major with an option in education, you will complete required courses in early childhood development, atypical development, teaching as a profession, American national government, societies, social problems and exceptional individuals. Human services majors then choose an additional 48 credits from a variety of departments to complete their Bachelor of Arts degree in human services.

Human Services Major, Bachelor of Arts (Social Science Option)

As a human services major with an option in social science, you will complete required courses in biology, accounting, management, finance, human resources management, professional speaking and writing, grants writing and research, a number of sociology classes and more, as well as an internship.

Psychology

Psychology Major

The psychology major at Waynesburg University is designed to equip students with the theoretical perspectives and methodological skills unique to the science of psychology in its view of behavior; enable students to use these perspectives and skills in developing insight into themselves and others; prepare students for graduate work in psychology and related fields embracing knowledge of self and others; and more generally, prepare students with the psychological skills necessary for related career fields not requiring a graduate degree; and, to provide other college programs with appropriate courses in psychology.

Psychology Minor

As a psychology minor at Waynesburg University, you will study 21 credits of psychology, personality, cognitive psychology, psychobiology and other courses selected from the psychology major curriculum.

Child Development Minor

Waynesburg University’s child development minor in psychology is recommended for students who wish to work with children or adolescents. The 21 credit minor provides an in-depth understanding of normal development from conception to the end of adolescence and focuses heavily on problems that might impact the development process.

Self-Development Minor

The self-development minor at Waynesburg University is recommended for students who plan to work in a therapeutic setting directly after graduation from a Bachelor of Arts program in psychology or a related field. The 21 credit minor is also recommended for any student whose future career will require interpersonal interaction.

Social Science

Social Science Major (Pre-Law Option)

The social science major with a focus in pre-law follows the recommendation of the American Bar Association in developing a wide range of skills that have been recognized as necessary for the successful completion of law school and a career in the law. Through specific learning objectives embedded in each course, pre-law students should be able to:

  • demonstrate a wide range of analytic and problem solving skills;
  • show the mastery of critical reading skills in a variety of genres and disciplines;
  • apply effective writing skills in different formats;
  • utilize effective oral communication and listening abilities;
  • demonstrate general research skills in the social sciences, humanities, and the natural sciences; and
  • apply effective time management and task organization in a demanding academic environment.

Political Science Minor

As a political science minor at Waynesburg University, you will study 18 credits of American national government, politics and four additional courses of your choosing within the political science curriculum.

Sociology

Sociology Major (Family Studies Option)

As a sociology major with a focus in family studies, you’ll become globally aware and locally active while learning about the needs of individuals, families, groups and communities. Students enrolled in the family studies option take special courses dedicated to family behavior, youth behavior, casework, history, social problems and more.

Sociology Major (Sociological Studies Option)

As a sociology major with a focus in sociological studies, you’ll learn about world history, psychology, moral leadership, minority relations, urban sociology, theory, research methods and more.

Sociology Major (Urban Studies Option)

As a sociology major with a focus in urban studies, you’ll see the world through the lens of different cultures and communities with profound opportunities to collaborate with others in the development of multi-cultural and global understanding. Through your coursework, you’ll analyze social problems with theories and evidence that can help in solving these problems, thus fostering the strong writing and presentation skills needed in a diverse world.

Sociology Minor

As a sociology minor at Waynesburg University, you will complete 21 credits in courses including principles of sociology, social problems, minority relations, urban sociology and an additional sociology course of your choice.

Academic Curriculum

POL 105. American National Government 3 credits

An examination of the structure and function of the national government of the United States and of the political forces of the governmental process; including the nature of democracy, constitutional development, the Presidency, the Congress, the judicial system, federalism, intergovernmental relations, and foreign policy.

POL 106. Introduction to Politics 3 credits

This course answers the question, "what is politics?" through the study of how politics has been defined and practiced from a variety of perspectives. The emphasis will be on concepts that are central to politics such as power, authority, liberty, obedience, and domination. Spring

POL 107. Fundamentals of Moral Leadership (Cross-listed as SOC 107) 3 credits

This course starts by teaching basic leadership skills. The second part of the course looks at a wide variety of successful and moral leaders. Spring

POL 115. U.S. Constitution – Values and Principles 3 credits

(Cross-listed as HIS 115) The United States is a creedal nation defined by the Constitution. This course examines the basic values and principles of the Constitution that determine our form of government, outline our rights and responsibilities as citizens, and shape the parameters of our civic discourse and life. Fall

POL 205. The American Presidency 3 credits

An analysis of Presidential campaigns and elections, Presidential personality, Presidential power, Constitutional limitations, and Presidential relations with Congress and the executive branch. Prerequisite: POL 105 or 106. (Fall 2013 and alternate years)

POL 206. American Foreign Policy 3 credits

An analysis of the principles, bases, and instruments of American foreign policy; the policy-making process; political-military interrelations. Special emphasis will be given to contemporary problems and trends in American foreign policy. Prerequisite: POL 105 or 106 or GEO 105. (Spring 2014 and alternate years)

POL 207. American Political Thought 3 credits

A survey of American political theorists from the "founding fathers" to the present. The emphasis is on understanding how their viewpoints have defined the purposes and affected the evolution of the United States government. Prerequisite: POL 105 or 106. (Spring 2015 and alternate years)

POL 208. State and Local Government 3 credits

Consideration is given to the state political systems including the constitutions and structure and the workings of the judicial, legislative, and executive branches. Special attention is given to the role of the governor, the state and the legislative process. The workings of the county and municipal governments and their interactions with the state are studied. Prerequisite: POL 105 or 106. (Fall 2014 and alternate years)

POL 209. Public Policy Analysis 3 credits

Integration of the formal and informal elements of domestic public policy. Substantive concentration on federal economic policy with a survey of the various political-economic philosophies and their implementation in the United States and the West European democracies. An explanation of the current policy process and projected trends in policy formulation will be provided. Prerequisite: POL 105 or 106. (Spring 2014 and alternate years)

POL 216. Statistics for the Social and Behavioral Sciences 3 credits

(Cross listed as HSV 216, PSY 216, and SOC 216) An introduction to statistical and data analytical techniques for students majoring in the social and behavioral sciences. Topics include descriptive statistics for central tendency, variation and association, fundamentals of probability, sampling distributions, the logic of inference, estimation and hypothesis tests for means and percentages, and an overview of more advanced techniques including the analysis of variance and correlation and regression. Prerequisite: MAT 106. Open to majors in HSV, PSY, SOC, and POL only. Spring.

POL 305. Jurisprudence 3 credits

An analysis of the concept of law, its historical development, and its relation to political society; includes consideration of philosophies of law — such as natural law and positivism — and the valuation of law in terms of justice, liberty, and the good society. Recommended for, but not limited to, pre-law students. Prerequisite: POL 105 or 106, or PHL 105. (Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit.)

POL 306. American Constitutional Law 3 credits

The study of the interpretation of the Constitution by the Supreme Court. The case method is used and various leading decisions of the Supreme Court are analyzed. Prerequisite: POL 105 or 106. (Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit.)

POL 307. The Legislative Process 3 credits

A study of the various processes associated with the legislative system, including representation and the electoral system, internal processes and power structure, external influence on a legislator's behavior, and Congress' involvement in policymaking. Concentration is on the United States Congress, although state and foreign legislatures are used for comparison. Prerequisite: POL 105 or 106. (Fall 2014 and alternate years)

POL 309. International Relations 3 credits

A study of the methods and objectives of diplomacy, portraying the forces and ideas molding the actions of statesmen and nations. Detailed consideration is given to the origins and operations of international institutions. Prerequisite: POL 105 or 106. (Spring 2015 and alternate years)

POL 315. Political Theory 3 credits

This course presents a critical examination and appraisal of the major schools of political thought from the Greeks through Marx. Students will read and discuss selections from major works such as Plato's The Republic, Machiavelli's The Prince, Locke's Second Treatise of Government, and Marx and Engel's The Communist Manifesto. Prerequisite: POL 105 or 106 or PHL 105. (Fall 2014 and alternate years)

POL 316. Comparative Politics 3 credits

This course examines and compares the political systems of three or more major modern nation-states. This study will include examination of the performance of legislative, executive, and judicial functions, the operations of interest groups and political parties, and the relevance of ideology and political culture to politics. Prerequisite: POL 105 or 106 or GEO 105. (Spring 2015 and alternate years)

POL 465. Internship 3-3 credits

Practical experience in government, social service agencies, or other appropriate public or private agencies. Internships are designed to serve two major purposes: first, to provide an opportunity for study and experience outside the traditional setting of the classroom and laboratory, yet within the framework of disciplined inquiry; and second, to provide a special opportunity for the participants to refine their emerging professional vocational interests. Students may earn three or six credits in one or two semesters, but no more than a total of six credits. May not be used to satisfy the area emphasis requirement. Prerequisites: POL 105 or 106, social science major, the instructor's permission, and junior or senior standing. Graded credit. (Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit.)

POL 475. Advanced Faith and Learning Integration 3 credits

In the spirit of the mission of Waynesburg University, this course intends to provide junior and senior level students with an unparalleled opportunity to integrate the Bible materials and its history of interpretation to the academic disciplines. Students who wish to engage in this level of theological reflection on vocation should consult with both their academic advisors and with the Chair of the Biblical and Ministry Studies Major Program. See page 116 for further information. This course will not substitute for senior capstone/research courses required in the majors. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing; three credits in BMS courses; 3.0 minimum grade point average. (Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit.)

POL 487. Honors Course 3-3 credits

Intensive research in some particular area of political science and the preparation of a research paper under the direction of the instructor; open only to seniors majoring in social science with an emphasis in political science who have a "B" average in political science and with the permission of the departmental chairman and the instructor. (Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit.)

POL 495. Special Topics in Political Science 3 credits

An analytic survey of selected topics in political science. Examples of such topics are comparative government of non-European areas (Asia, Latin America, Africa), and civil liberties. Prerequisite: POL 105 or 106. (Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit.)

PSY 105. Introduction to Psychology 3 credits

A survey of the content fields in psychology and the methods used to understand human behavior. This course is a prerequisite for all other courses in psychology. PSY 106. Social Psychology 3 credits An analysis of human conduct in social settings. Prerequisite: PSY 105. Spring

PSY 107. Human Development: A Life Span Perspective 3 credits

A developmental course spanning the entire life cycle from birth to death. Emphasis will be placed on the psychological, biological, sociological, philosophical, and historical bases of human development from prenatal and infant development, through child and adolescent development, and culminating in adulthood and aging, to complete the life cycle. Prerequisite: PSY 105.

PSY 201. Developmental Psychology: Birth to Twelve Years 3 credits

This course will examine the cognitive, physical, and social development of the child from conception to twelve years of age. Prerequisite: PSY 105. Fall

PSY 202. Developmental Psychology: The Adolescent 3 credits

This course will examine the cognitive, physical, emotional, and social development of the adolescent (13 to 20 years of age). Prerequisite: PSY 105. Spring

PSY 205. Personality 3 credits

The major theories of personality, personality development, and personality assessment. Prerequisite: Six semester hours of psychology. Fall

PSY 206. Human Adjustment 3 credits

This course will examine how one adjusts to day-to-day events and situations in life and the developmental factors that are involved in the adjustment process. Emphasis will be placed on self-developmental, emotional, and social factors that affect one's adjustment to day-to-day events and situations. The relationship between past developmental experiences and current and future adjustment will be considered. Prerequisite: PSY 105. (Spring 2014 and alternate years)

PSY 208. Psychology as a Profession 3 credits

Specifically designed for psychology majors or minors, this course provides an introduction to the discipline of professional psychology as it is reflected in contemporary theory and practice. Students will develop an ability to evaluate and utilize information from psychological research published in leading journals, as well as to write research that meet the current standards and practice of psychology. This course will guide students in developing a personal plan for achieving their own goals as psychology students and, when appropriate, strategies for graduate school application or career placement and development. Students are required to become student affiliates of the American Psychological Association. Prerequisite: PSY 105. Fall

PSY 209. Introduction to Exceptional Individuals: 3 credits

Society, School, and Family (Cross-listed as SPE 209) This course is designed to introduce pre-service teacher-education students to the philosophical, legal, and historical foundations of the education of exceptional students. The term "exceptional" is used by educators to describe any individual whose physical, mental, or behavioral performance deviates substantially from the norm, either higher or lower. In this course, exceptional students will include individuals with disabilities and/or giftedness. A study of the models and theories of typical/atypical growth, behaviors, and the current identification criteria used to describe the characteristics of exceptional learners will be emphasized. This course is also required for all Elementary and Secondary Majors. Prerequisite: EDU 205.

PSY 215. Human Violence and Survival 3 credits

An exploration of traditional and contemporary psychological theories of human aggression. Theories related to the motives of perpetrators of violence, the psychological effects on victims, the process of recovery from violence, and psychosocial dynamics related to the prevention of violence will be covered. (Fall 2014 and alternate years)

PSY 216. Statistics for the Social and Behavioral Sciences 3 credits

(Cross-listed as HSV 216, POL 216, and SOC 216) An introduction to statistical and data analytical techniques for students majoring in the social and behavioral sciences. Topics include descriptive statistics for central tendency, variation and association, fundamentals of probability, sampling distributions, and the logic of inference, estimation, and hypothesis tests for means and percentages, and an overview of more advanced techniques including the analysis of variance and correlation and regression. Prerequisite: MAT 106. Open to majors in HSV, PSY, SOC, and POL only. Spring

PSY 217. Sports Psychology 3 credits

Both mental and physical aspects are involved in sport and exercise activities. This course provides an introduction to the study of human behavior patterns as they relate to sport and exercise. Athletes, coaches, athletic trainers and other sport and exercise-related professionals must understand these aspects to be successful. Topics covered include personality, anxiety and arousal, imagery, goal setting and injury. Prerequisite: PSY 105. (Spring 2015 and alternate years)

PSY 218. Cognitive Psychology 3 credits

This course will provide a broad overview of human cognition. It will explore why humans think and believe the things that they do, the nature of memory, and the process of thought. It will examine the ways in which attention, perception, learning, memory, problem-solving, thinking and reasoning help us to make decisions and cope with everyday life. Current research in the field of cognitive psychology will be presented and evaluated. Prerequisite: PSY 105. (Spring 2014 and alternate years)

PSY 306. Forensic Psychology 3 credits

The use of psychology by the law, and the regulation of psychology by the law are both relatively recent. These interactions will be the focus of the course. Topics will range from the effects of drugs on behavior, the sources of criminal behavior, deviancy in society, the standards of evidence, sanity, competency, custody, and profiling. Other topics will be discussed. Prerequisite: PSY 105. (Fall 2013 and alternate years)

PSY 308. Abnormal Psychology 3 credits

The psychobiological and psychosocial factors in the development of psychopathology. Prerequisites: PSY 105 and 205 or permission of the department chair. Spring

PSY 309. Learning 3 credits

This course provides an introduction to the basic concepts and processes of learning and memory, with particular emphasis on animal learning and cognition, as well as the continuing influence of the early researchers in this field. As a result of this course, students should be able to recognize the influence of the environment on behavior, distinguish between major types of learning, identify basic principles of learning, use the technical terminology appropriate to the psychology of learning, and appreciate the significant role that learning plays in the lives of human and nonhuman animals. Prerequisite: PSY 105. Fall

PSY 311. Research Methods 3 credits

This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the methods used for the collection and analysis of data in psychology. The steps in the scientific study of behavior, including literature review, method selection, and statistical analysis of data will be covered. Topics to be covered include experimental design, ethics, descriptive and inferential statistics, and the preparation of research reports. Students must take this course immediately prior to taking PSY 312. Prerequisites: PSY 105 and PSY 216. Fall

PSY 312. Experimental Psychology 3 credits

This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to engage in psychological research firsthand. Students will be conducting scientific literature reviews, collecting data, analyzing data using statistical software, writing research reports, and presenting their research at a mock research conference held on campus. Students must take this course immediately after taking PSY 311. Prerequisites: PSY 311, ENG 101 and 102. Spring.

PSY 315. Psychological Measurement and Evaluation 3 credits

An introduction to the philosophy and practice of psychological measurement. Emphasis is placed upon the statistical techniques which form the basis for the development and interpretation of psychological tests. The student becomes directly acquainted with testing procedures through simulated administration of a variety of tests and analyzing psychological evaluations that summarize and interpret test results. Prerequisites: Six semester hours of psychology, PSY 216, or permission of the instructor. (Spring 2014 and alternate years)

PSY 316. Psychobiology 3 credits

This class will familiarize students with the principles of biological psychology as well as with the relationships between behavior and brain /neurological functions. This course provides a survey and discussion of the structure and functions of the nervous system, the sensory and motor systems needed for daily functioning and the biology behind emotions, sleep, learning, sex, reproduction, and mental illnesses. Prerequisite: PSY 105. (Fall 2013 and alternate years)

PSY 317. Psychology of Religion (Cross-listed as BMS 317) 3 credits

This course is designed to help the student understand the ways in which individual and social psychology and the process of spiritual growth influence one another. The student will understand how people develop spiritually, and how psychology can help to encourage this growth. Both spiritual and psychological authors are included in the reading. This course is intended to encourage individual thought and to aid in the students' struggle to maintain faith while learning this science. Prerequisite: PSY 105. (Spring 2014 and alternate years)

PSY 326. Psychology of Women (Cross-listed as SOC 326) 3 credits

An examination of psychology as it relates to women and psychological issues of concern to women. Issues of concern will include, but not be limited to, media images of women, women and leadership, gender differences, relationships, career success, sexuality, date rape and psychological disorders that are represented disproportionately among women. Prerequisite: PSY 105. (Spring 2015 and alternate years)

PSY 406. Psychotherapy 3 credits

An introduction to the theory and practice of psychotherapy, with particular emphasis on the principles of clinical intervention, counseling skills, consultative processes and case-study techniques. Prerequisite: PSY 105, 205, or permission from the instructor. (Spring 2015 and alternate years)

PSY 409. The History of Psychology 3 credits

This course will examine the discipline of psychology in a historical context, focusing on its philosophical and physiological underpinnings. Prerequisite: PHL 105 and fifteen semester hours of psychology. Spring

PSY 415. Capstone Course for Self-Development Minor 3 credits

This course is to be the final course taken in the sequence for the self-development minor. This course will focus on integrating the information that was presented in the other course that the student has taken to complete the minor. The student will use that information to assess his/her own development and determine how his/her personality and life view affects his/her relationships with members of the family and clients, subordinates, co-workers, superiors or students in the workplace. (Fall 2014 and alternate years)

PSY 465. Psychology Internship Program 6 credits

A field-placement wherein qualified students intern as paraprofessionals in the ongoing activities of one or more social service agencies in the community. A total of 15 hours per week of agency-related activities is involved as well as one two-hour seminar per week. Limited to psychology majors and minors. Prerequisite: 15 semester hours in psychology including PSY 406; approval of the department. Passfail grade. (Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit)

PSY 466. Child Development Internship 6 credits

A field-placement wherein qualified students intern as paraprofessionals in an ongoing activities of a facility that is involved in serving children such as Children and Youth Services of a day care center. A total of 15 hours per week of agencyrelated activities is involved as well as one two-hour seminar per week. Limited to psychology majors in the child development minor. Prerequisites: 15 hours in psychology, including PSY 201 and 202. Pass-fail grade. (Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit.)

PSY 475. Advanced Faith and Learning Integration 3 credits

In the spirit of the mission of Waynesburg University, this course intends to provide junior and senior level students with an unparalleled opportunity to integrate the Bible materials and its history of interpretation to the academic disciplines. Students who wish to engage in this level of theological reflection on vocation should consult with both their academic advisors and with the Chair of the Biblical and Ministry Studies Major Program. See page 116 for further information. This course will not substitute for senior capstone/research courses required in the majors. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing; three credits in BMS courses; 3.0 minimum grade point average. (Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit.)

PSY 495. Special Topics 3 credits

Appropriate and related topics pertaining to the student's specialized interest. Subject matter to be arranged. Prerequisite: Permission of department chair. (Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit)

PSY 497. Independent Research 2-3 credits

Independent study and research into specific topics and problems in the field of psychology. Open to junior and senior psychology majors with permission of the department chair. (Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit.)

SOC 105. Principles of Sociology 3 credits

The basic concepts of sociology, including culture, social organization, socialization, deviance, and stratification are introduced.

SOC 106. Societies 3 credits

An examination of the nature, evolution, and varieties of human societies with an emphasis on industrial societies. Fall

SOC 205. Social Problems 3 credits

A sociological examination of contemporary problems of modern societies. Emphasis is placed upon the structural nature of social problems and the tensions created by societal change. Prerequisite: SOC 105 or SOC 106. Spring

SOC 107. Fundamentals of Moral Leadership (Cross-listed as POL 107) 3 credits

This course starts by teaching basic leadership skills. The second part of the course looks at a wide variety of successful and moral leaders. Spring SOC 206. Introduction to Social Work 3 credits Introduces students to the goals, values, and historical development of social work as a profession and career; with emphasis on its body of knowledge, unique methods and service delivery in its settings of practice. Prerequisites: SOC 105 and PSY 105. Fall

SOC 216. Statistics for the Social and Behavioral Sciences 3 credits

(Cross-listed as HSV 216, POL 216, and PSY 216) An introduction to statistical and data analytical techniques for students majoring in the social and behavioral sciences. Topics include descriptive statistics for central tendency, variation and association, fundamentals of probability, sampling distributions, the logic of inference, estimation and hypothesis tests for means and percentages, and an overview of more advanced techniques including the analysis of variance and correlation and regression. Prerequisite: MAT 106. Open to majors in HSV, PSY, SOC, and POL only. Spring

SOC 305. Formal Organizations 3 credits

Characteristics of formal organizations such as corporations, government agencies, schools, hospitals, and the military; historical development of bureaucratic organizations; sociological theories of and research on organizational processes such as recruitment, socialization, social control, succession, and conflict. Prerequisite: SOC 105 or 106. (Spring 2015 and alternate years)

SOC 306. The Family 3 credits

A cross-cultural analysis of the family as a social institution with special emphasis on the family in the U.S. Changing sex and age roles, and alternate family forms are also investigated. Prerequisite: SOC 105 or 106. (Spring 2014 and alternate years.)

SOC 307. Minority Relations (Cross-listed with HIS 338) 3 credits

Majority-minority relations in heterogeneous societies with particular emphasis on the U.S. The assimilation process exhibited by specific ethnic, religious, and racial groups is analyzed, as well as the nature of prejudice and discrimination experiences by such groups. Prerequisite: SOC 105 or 106. (Fall 2013 and alternate years)

SOC 308. Deviant Behavior 3 credits

Examinations of various forms of socially labeled deviance including crime, delinquency, mental illness, alcoholism, drug abuse, homosexuality, and organizational deviance. Consideration of subcultures, theories of deviance, and social control. Prerequisite: SOC 105 or 106. (Fall 2014 and alternate years)

SOC 309. Urban Sociology 3 credits

The city as a social form including demography, ecology, social organization, and the social psychology of urban life. Prerequisite: SOC 105 or 106. (Fall 2013 and alternate years)

SOC 315. Juvenile Delinquency 3 credits

Delinquency as a social and individual problem; the nature and extent of delinquency; sociological theories of delinquency causation; the administration of juvenile justice, and the control and prevention of delinquency; recent legal changes affecting the status of juveniles and juvenile justice procedures. Prerequisite: SOC 105 or 106. Fall

SOC 316. Criminology 3 credits

Examination of the structural and cultural nature of crime; sociological theories of criminal behavior; current and proposed penal methods. Prerequisite: SOC 105 or 106. Spring

SOC 317. Social Stratification 3 credits

The origins and development of structured social inequality culminating in modernday class systems; theories of stratification; particular emphasis upon class, status, and power hierarchies in American society, and mobility within each. Prerequisite: SOC 105 or 106. (Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit.)

SOC 318. Medical Sociology 3 credits

Sociological perspectives on medicine and public health; the social psychological factors affecting health and illness; cultural variation in definition of health and health needs. Prerequisite: SOC 105 or 106. (Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit.)

SOC 319. Religion in America (Cross-listed as BMS 319) 3 credits

The course will examine the context of religion both in concept and in its practical sequences for individuals and public institutions within American society. Material will emphasize the role or effect of religion upon American life and culture, and the impact of the social environment upon various American religious traditions. (Fall 2013 and alternate years)

SOC 325. Introduction to Social Casework 3 credits

This course is designed to give students the opportunity to apply theories and concepts that have been learned in previous sociology and psychology courses to a variety of social problems that professional helpers encounter in their daily practice. Course activities include role-play, case analysis, self-evaluation, and class dialogue that will assess students' interpersonal and diagnostic skills. Prerequisites: SOC 206 or permission of the instructor. Spring

SOC 326. Psychology of Women (Cross-listed as PSY 326) 3 credits

An examination of psychology as it relates to women and psychological issues of concern to women. Issues of concern will include, but not be limited to, media images of women, women and leadership, gender differences, relationships, career success, sexuality, date rape, and psychological disorders that are represented disproportionately among women. Prerequisite: PSY 105. (Spring 2015 and alternate years)

SOC 327. Cultural Difference in 21st Century America 3 credits

The principal goal of this course is to expand awareness of cultural differences among students from all backgrounds. This course will examine the nature of difference, inequality, and privilege with regard to age, race, ethnicity, class, sex, religion, gender, sexual orientation, and disability in 21st century America. Fall

SOC 328. Sociology of Globalization and Post-Colonial Cultures 3 credits

This course examines the powerful socio-cultural, political, economic and religious forces that are pervasive and profound not just locally, but also globally. It seeks to address the following questions: What is globalization? What are post-colonial cultures? What are the interplay of religion and globalization especially since 9/11/2001? Is the world being homogenized through pervasive forces of modernity/ post-modernity or "class of civilizations"? Conceptualization and discourse on globalization have often failed to deal with post-colonial cultures in critical and systematic ways. This course will help us to rethink the concept of society, boundaries and processes of formation in a globalized age. Furthermore, the course will explore how sociology of immigration, religion and ethnicity intertwined over the last 20 years especially among immigrants in the United States. Spring

SOC 395. Topics in Social Psychology 3 credits

Selected topics in social psychology from a sociological perspective. These may include social influence processes, social interactions, small group processes, the attitude-behavior relationship, adult socialization, collective behavior, and culture and personality. Prerequisite: SOC 105 or 106. (Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit.)

SOC 405. Sociological Theory 3 credits

Analysis of the development of sociological thought with emphasis upon the significant European and American theorists of the late 19th and 20th centuries. Prerequisite: Nine hours of sociology (including SOC 105) or permission of the instructor. (Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit.)

SOC 406. Social Science Research Methods 3 credits

Survey of the logic and techniques of social science research. Major topics include problem formation, research design, measurements, sampling, data collection strategies, and elements of data analysis. Prerequisite: 12 hours of social science and HSV/PSY/SOC or POL 216. Fall

SOC 465. Internship 3-6 credits

Practical experience in government, social service agencies, or other appropriate public or private agencies. Internships are designed to serve two major purposes: First, to provide an opportunity for study and experience outside the traditional setting of the classroom and laboratory, yet within the framework of disciplined inquiry; and second, to provide a special opportunity for the participants to refine their emerging professional vocational interests. Students may earn three or six credits in one or two semesters, but no more than a total of six credits. May not be used to satisfy the area emphasis requirement. Prerequisites: Social science major, SOC 105, the instructor's permission, and junior or senior standing. Graded credit. (Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit.)

SOC 475. Advanced Faith and Learning Integration 3 credits

In the spirit of the mission of Waynesburg University, this course intends to provide junior and senior level students with an unparalleled opportunity to integrate the Bible materials and its history of interpretation to the academic disciplines. Students who wish to engage in this level of theological reflection on vocation should consult with both their academic advisors and with the Chair of the Biblical and Ministry Studies Major Program. See page 116 for further information. This course will not substitute for senior capstone/research courses required in the majors. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing; three credits in BMS courses; 3.0 minimum grade point average. (Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit.)

SOC 487. Honors Course 3 credits

Intensive research in some particular area of sociology and the preparation of a research paper under the direction of the instructor; open only to seniors majoring in social science with an emphasis in sociology who have a "B" average in sociology and with the permission of the departmental chairman and the instructor. (Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit.)

SOC 495. Selected Topics in Sociology 3 credits

An in-depth study of a particular sociological topic. Such subjects may include the sociology of developing nations, community power, social movements, and utopian societies. Prerequisite: Six semester hours of sociology (including SOC 105) or permission of the instructor. (Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit.)

HSV 216. Statistics for the Social and Behavioral Sciences 3 credits

(Crosslisted as POL 216, PSY 216 and SOC 216) An introduction to statistical and data analytical techniques for students majoring in the social and behavioral sciences. Topics include descriptive statistics for central tendency, variation and association, fundamentals of probability, sampling distributions, the logic of inference, estimation and hypothesis tests for means and percentages, and an overview of more advanced techniques including the analysis of variance and correlation and regression. Prerequisite: MAT 106. Open to majors in HSV, PSY, SOC, and POL only. Spring.

HSV 465. Human Services Internship 6 credits

A professionally supervised practical experience in a public or private human services agency. Successful completion of the internship requires at least 215 hours in the field plus one hour per week consultation with the supervising professor. Prerequisites: Enrollment as a human services major, junior or senior standing, and the approval of the internship site and permission to enroll given by the Admissions and Progression Committee.

HSV 475. Advanced Faith and Learning Integration 3 credits

In the spirit of the mission of Waynesburg University, this course intends to provide junior and senior level students with an unparalleled opportunity to integrate the Bible materials and its history of interpretation to the academic disciplines. Students who wish to engage in this level of theological reflection on vocation should consult with both their academic advisors and with the Chair of the Biblical and Ministry Studies Major Program. See page 116 for further information. This course will not substitute for senior capstone/research courses required in the majors. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing; three credits in BMS courses; 3.0 minimum grade point average. (Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit.)

Social Sciences

Testimonials Before I left to study abroad, I fantasized about returning as a more intelligent individual with all the answers. Now that my experience is complete, I have realized I gained something more valuable than that—questions. The right questions are the key to understanding.
Karen Moyer, a 2012 sociology, pre-law alumnae