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b2ap3_thumbnail_8-19-Anderson.jpgWaynesburg University will host Philip Anderson as the Glenn A. and Jane L. Crosby Lecture Series speaker Wednesday, Sept. 2, at 7 p.m. The lecture will be held in Alumni Hall on the campus of Waynesburg University. Admission is free, and the public is cordially invited to attend. 

Anderson is a program director within the Department of Computer Science and Digital Technologies at Northumbria University in the United Kingdom, where he is responsible for strategic direction and effective management of a number of programs within the department. 

Anderson’s lecture, “The Challenges of Developing and Teaching a Digital Forensics Curriculum,” will outline a number of learning and teaching methods and approaches that can be used to effectively teach a digital forensics degree curriculum. 

His address will highlight the challenges and potential solutions identified thus far by Northumbria University in their Computer and Digital Forensics degree course delivery. Anderson will also discuss industry and student views while examining potential career pathways for graduates. 

Anderson has more than 14 years of extensive teaching experience in higher education with more than nine years of subject expertise in developing and teaching digital and computer forensic modules. His main research interests are innovative learning and teaching and student assessments.

The Glenn A. and Jane L. Crosby Lectures, funded by 1950 Magna Cum Laude graduates of Waynesburg University Glenn A. and Jane Lichtenfels Crosby, bring to the University visiting scholars who are distinguished in their disciplines. During the visit, the scholars interact with faculty, staff and students, giving guest lectures in classes, formal presentations and informal group talks. The event culminates in a final public lecture.

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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As a senior at Waynesburg University, family and friends often ask me if I like attending Waynesburg. My answer is typically a resounding yes. Not only have I enjoyed my time at Waynesburg, I would also recommend Waynesburg to high school students beginning their college search. Here are 5 reasons why. 

  1. You will build meaningful relationships with your professors and just about anyone else on campus. This is the number one reason I love Waynesburg. My professors don’t just know my name; they know my strengths and interests. They truly care about my success and demonstrate their concern by investing time in me. My professors have assisted me with resume building, academic planning and career counseling; however, professors aren’t the only faculty members that offer students support. I’m often given hugs from cafeteria workers, comedic relief from security guards and smiles from administrative staff. Waynesburg is a relationship-centered institution, and that is proven each day from the actions of faculty and staff. 
  2. You can’t skip class. Of course you are allotted three unexcused absences before your grade is affected, but class attendance is arguably more than highly encouraged, it is mandatory. While some people may think I am crazy for viewing this as a pro, I view attendance checks as a positive aspect of attending a small school. Because my absence is recognizable, I am encouraged to take full advantage of my education by attending each class.
  3. Class engagement is encouraged. At Waynesburg, you will never sit in a large auditorium being lectured for an hour. You will have small classes in which you will be encouraged to participate. My classmates and I often ‘interrupt’ class to ask a question or share our opinion on the topic we are discussing; however, our interjections are never frowned upon, they are welcomed. I enjoy participating in a learning environment in which my input is valuable and my questions and concerns are always met with suggestions and solutions. 
  4. Everything is within walking distance. This may be true of other small colleges, but I believe it is especially true of Waynesburg. My commute to class from my dorm is never longer than five minutes. The same goes for my trips to my club meetings, work-study job, the gym, library or cafeteria. This means that even if I am running late (which is often), it is easy to get to where I need to be on time, and if I forget something in my dorm, it is never a pain to simply return to my dorm between classes to retrieve the forgotten item. I love the gorgeous campus landscape that allows for easy walkability, despite all the hills! 
  5. You will be positioned to succeed in your courses. With extremely accessible professors, free tutoring and writing services, you will have multiple resources to help you succeed in your courses. While transitioning from high school to college is difficult, attending a school like Waynesburg eased my transition. My class size in high school was similar to that of my class size at Waynesburg, eliminating the overwhelming aspect of adapting to a new learning environment. In fact, in my time at Waynesburg, I have improved my GPA since high school, which is something not many people can say. This is due in part to the individualized attention that I receive from my professors. If I am ever struggling, I know I can turn to my professors to offer guidance and support. 
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b2ap3_thumbnail_IMG_0675_20150717-154747_1.JPGLike most 18-year-olds trying to decide what it was that I wanted to do with the rest of my life, I was confused, lost and arguably disoriented. As I heard classmates speak of their future plans, neatly organized into a college major and future profession, I felt the panic start to sink in. 

Though I had already committed to Waynesburg University for the fall of 2012 and had declared my major as accounting, I was far from certain that I would spend the rest of my life crunching numbers. Nonetheless, in August of 2012, I embarked on my journey at Waynesburg University. 

In my first semester as a business major, I did exceedingly well, earning a 4.0 and ending the semester with good rapport with my professors whom ensured me that I held promise in my pursuit of a career in accounting. I regarded my successes as a good sign, and thought that maybe I wasn’t as lost as I had thought.

I continued on in the program, taking another accounting class in which I continued to excel, but deep down, I knew that I was lacking a passion for my studies. At times, it took a great deal of effort to bring myself to study my business textbooks. 

On the other hand, the College Composition course that I enrolled in during my second semester commanded my attention. I loved that it allowed me to write persuasively and develop compelling, fact-based arguments about hard issues facing our society. In other words, I was hooked and wanted to know where this new- found passion could lead.  

I decided to email my professor, Mrs. Nofsinger, and ask to meet with her to discuss my fascination with her course and my desire to learn more about career options. As a freshman, I was not yet aware of the relationship-centered culture of Waynesburg University, but I was about to discover what the university that I enrolled in was all about. 

My professor invited me to join her for lunch to discuss what was on my mind. We talked for an hour and she suggested I take a journalism course, promised me books for further exploration and recommended that I visit the counseling center for more vocational guidance. She also informed me that if I ever needed anything, to just let her know.

I was blown away by her kindness, but after meeting with several other professors and faculty members to discuss my options and smooth out the details of changing majors, I quickly discovered that this kindness was simply the Waynesburg way. Flash-forward to my senior year as a student in the Department of Communication, and I now know that my professors are not just teachers; they are mentors and personal resources there to encourage and offer advice to students when possible. 

Though unsure of the path I had chosen upon graduating high school, I could not be happier with my decision to come to Waynesburg University. While initially lost, I found my way in the loving atmosphere that is Waynesburg University. 

 

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b2ap3_thumbnail_intern.JPGThaddeus Statler, a senior Waynesburg University business management major interning with Aflac, was recently named the winner of the company’s nationwide 2015 Elevate! Intern contest.

The Elevate! Intern contest, which ran from February 9 to May 8, was a contest for all interns associated with Aflac. It measured total accounts opened as well as the overall production of interns.  

The Mount Morris, Pennsylvania, native sold the most policies of all Aflac interns and opened three new accounts during the contest time frame. 

“Waynesburg University prepared me for this opportunity,” said Statler. “I have taken a few classes that I was able to apply towards understanding people and the product I was offering, as well as the presentation of that product. Being comfortable with people was my most valuable resource, which the climate at Waynesburg has definitely influenced.”

Statler also acknowledges his relationship with his business professors in his successes.

“I am most specifically thankful to Professor [Neely] Lantz and Professor [Christian] Ola, as they helped educate me on topics I would be using at my internship,” said Statler. “Their openness and willingness to talk on their own time, give me personal advice and even share their own experiences with me was more than I could have asked.”

For his accomplishment, Statler will receive a $5,000 scholarship and a trip to Columbus, Georgia, to visit Aflac headquarters.

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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