Blog posts tagged in ACS

The American Chemical Society (ACS) student chapter at Waynesburg University was recently selected to receive the “Outstanding Award” for the fifth consecutive year. The award is a result of the chapter’s activities conducted during the 2015-16 academic year.

The congratulatory letter from ACS President Donna Nelson read as follows: “Professors Evonne Baldauff and Robert LaCount, faculty advisors of the chapter, deserve special commendation. Few faculty members are willing to make the great commitment of time and energy that a successful chapter requires. Professor Baldauff and Professor LaCount’s efforts certainly represent the best in undergraduate science education and mentoring around the country. We extend our warmest congratulations to the students and Professors Baldauff and LaCount for setting such a fine example for other chapters and being exemplary chemistry ambassadors!”

More than 400 student chapter reports were submitted for review by The Society Committee on Education. As a result of the reports, 284 awards were given, including 46 outstanding, 93 commendable and 145 honorable mention awards.

“One of the highlights of my job is working with this group of students,” said Dr. Evonne Baldauff, associate professor of chemistry and chair of the Department of Chemistry and Forensic Science at Waynesburg University. “They undertake an extraordinary amount of work in addition to their regular courses to plan and host numerous events throughout the academic year to benefit the campus and community. I’m so proud of these students and all of the quality work that they accomplish.”

Led by Baldauff and Dr. Robert LaCount, professor emeritus of chemistry, the student chapter was highly involved in campus and community outreach activities throughout the year, such as monthly labs for homeschooled students, a Haunted Lab open to the campus and local community, among many others.  The chapter recently implemented a new program in which local high school classes receive supplemental instruction in chemistry in Waynesburg University labs.

Waynesburg and the other award winning chapters will be honored at the 253rd ACS National Meeting in San Francisco, California in April 2017.

ACS is a congressionally independent membership organization which represents professionals at all degree levels and in all fields of chemistry and sciences that involve chemistry.

Founded in 1849 by the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, Waynesburg University is located on a traditional campus in the hills of southwestern Pennsylvania, with three additional sites located in the Pittsburgh region. The University is a member of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU) and is one of only 21 Bonner Scholar schools in the country, offering local, regional and international opportunities to touch the lives of others through service.

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Ashley Wise, Associate Director of University Relations

724-852-7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

 

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b2ap3_thumbnail_4-4-ACS-Conference.jpgFour Waynesburg University students presented abstracts at the American Chemical Society (ACS) National Meeting and Exposition in San Diego, Calif., in March 2016.

“The benefits of attending national conferences are both varied and extensive,” said Evonne Baldauff, associate professor of chemistry and chair of the Chemistry and Forensic Science Department. “Students gain experience presenting their research thus improving their communication skills and providing them a sense of ownership of their work in the lab.”

Trenton Bromenschenkel, senior biochemistry major, presented an abstract that focused on finding easy ways to remove ethanol from small engines using molecular sieves. He studied how effective the sieves were with multiple extractions along with their saturation limits.

“I didn’t realize how many students like me are conducting research across the nation,” said Bromenschenkel. “I also learned about new developments in the biomedical research field. There are some very innovative scientists performing research.”

Cassandra Gates, senior biochemistry major, shared her abstract that focused on the chemical analysis of coffee to predict quality and balance. Her research was conducted through a variety of analytical techniques by testing both beans and coffee in brewed form.

“My coursework at Waynesburg has provided me with the skills and knowledge necessary to perform my research and present,” said Gates. “I would not have been able to comprehend and think critically about the research of others without the chemistry knowledge I received from my classes.”

Brian Karns, senior forensic science major, focused on how crime scene reconstruction of shootings could benefit from data collected from trace materials on recovered bullets or the terminal ballistic pathway. In his study, full-metal jacket, soft-point and hollow-point 9 mm rounds were fired through common structural materials and their paths were terminated in ballistic gelatin.

“In addition to the lectures, I had the opportunity to meet a few people in my field and network, which will hopefully benefit me as I begin looking for a job,” said Karns.

Jelena Kyle, senior forensic science major, conducted research on the vast number of compounds in a single cup of coffee which include thirteen key aroma compounds. She used a headspace-solid phase micro-extraction technique along with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to characterize the compounds, in addition to the variable of time.

“It was really great meeting chemists from all over the world,” said Kyle. “I even received a job offer when I was presenting my poster, which was pretty cool.”

A conference such as the ACS National Meeting and Exposition also provides students with the opportunities to attend research presentations, networking seminars, graduate school recruitment events and career development workshops.

ACS is a congressionally independent membership organization which represents professionals at all degree levels and in all fields of chemistry and sciences that involve chemistry.

Founded in 1849 by the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, Waynesburg University is located on a traditional campus in the hills of southwestern Pennsylvania, with three additional sites located in the Pittsburgh region. The University is a member of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU) and is one of only 21 Bonner Scholar schools in the country, offering local, regional and international opportunities to touch the lives of others through service.

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Ashley Wise, Assistant Director of University Relations

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Monogram Small.jpgThe Waynesburg University American Chemical Society chapter (ACS) was instrumental in planning undergraduate programming at the recent ACS Central Eastern Regional Meeting (CERM) held Wednesday, Oct. 29, through Saturday, Nov. 1, at the Doubletree Hotel in Greentree, Pa.

“Planning all of the undergraduate programming for CERM 2014 was a great opportunity for our ACS chapter,” said Evonne Baldauff, chairperson for the chemistry and forensic science department and associate professor of chemistry at Waynesburg University. “Our students were instrumental in designing, organizing and implementing all of the undergraduate events during this meeting.”  

Prior to the event, the ACS chapter wrote a grant and was awarded $2,800 from the ACS undergraduate office. The monetary award was used to plan and fund the meeting.

Five sessions were offered for students during Friday’s event including an undergraduate research poster session, a networking and resume luncheon, a workshop on how to be a successful student chapter, a keynote speaker and a social event for the students. 

“This proved to be a significant amount of work, yet the results were worth the effort,” Baldauff said. “The activities were successful and well-attended by undergraduates from a wide representation of colleges and universities in the region.  We are very pleased with the overall experience.”

Waynesburg University students involved in planning CERM 2014: 

•Andrew Heinle, a senior forensic science major from Brackenridge (Highlands High School)

•Cassie Gates, a junior chemistry major from Penn Hills (Penn Hills Senior High School)

•Chrissy Kaste, a senior forensic science major from Waynesburg (Phoenixville Area High School)

•Corey Rugh, a senior biology major from Smithfield (Albert Gallatin Area Senior High School)

•Dylan Matt, a junior forensic science major from Springfield, Ohio (Home schooled)

•Grant Strouse, a junior chemistry major from Millersburg, Ohio (West Holmes High School)

•Mackenzie Hammer, a junior chemistry major from McKees Rocks (Montour High School)

•Marlana Pratt, a junior biology major from Mapleville, R.I. (Burrillville High School)

•Nicolas Frazee, a senior mathematics major from New Kensington (Saint Joseph High School)

•Tara Faggioli, a senior chemistry major from Jefferson Hills (Thomas Jefferson High School)

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

 

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Monogram Small.jpgWaynesburg University’s American Chemical Society (ACS) student chapter was recently selected to receive the “Outstanding Chapter Award” from the American Chemical Society for the fifth consecutive year. The award is a result of the chapter’s activities conducted during the 2012-13 academic year. 

More than 400 student chapter annual activity reports were reviewed by the Society Committee on Education (SOCED). As a result of the reports, 280 awards were given, including 44 “Outstanding,” 85 “Commendable,” and 151 “Honorable Mention” awards. Waynesburg University was one of only 44 chapters selected to receive the “Outstanding Award.”

Under the direction of Dr. Robert LaCount, professor emeritus of chemistry at Waynesburg University, and Dr. Evonne Baldauff, assistant professor of chemistry and chair of the Department of Chemistry at Waynesburg University, the ACS student chapter was highly involved in campus and community outreach activities throughout the year such as monthly labs for homeschooled students, a Haunted Lab open to the campus and local community and the Food Chemistry and Green Chemistry programs offered to local Girl Scout members, among many others. 

Student chapter members also provide service to the department, work to foster community within the group through social events offered throughout the academic year, and participate in National Chemistry Week including volunteering at ChemFest at the Carnegie Science Center and hosting the Periodic Table of Cupcakes on campus. 

The congratulatory letter from ACS President Tom Barton read as follows: “Professors Evonne Baldauff and Robert LaCount, faculty advisors of the chapter, deserve special commendation. Few faculty members are willing to make the great commitment of time and energy that a successful chapter requires. Professor Baldauff and Professor LaCount’s efforts certainly represent the best in undergraduate science education and mentoring around the country. We extend our warmest congratulations to the students and Professors Baldauff and LaCount for setting such a fine example for other chapters and being exemplary chemistry ambassadors!”

For more information, contact Baldauff at 724-852-3617.

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Ashley Wise, Senior Writer/Editor

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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