Blog posts tagged in Eberly Library

b2ap3_thumbnail_12-19-Redd-essay.jpgFor Rea Redd, director of Waynesburg University’s Eberly Library, Civil War area history is more than a hobby or interest—it is a passion. And during the past two years, Redd has put his passion and expertise to use to produce a chapter in the recently published book of essays, “Turning Points of the American Civil War.”

Redd’s chapter, ‘The Point of No Return: Turning Points Within the 1864 Presidential Election and the Doom of the Confederacy,’ examines attitudes during the election for Lincoln’s second term, during the Civil War. Redd said that the process for publication took about two years.

“I worked on it nearly every evening and weekend for three months,” he said. “The editing process took a year and then another 12 months for its publication.”

Redd conducted extensive research to perfect his essay, and said it was a “learning experience.” He especially enjoyed the process of dealing with deadlines and revision.

“My favorite part was writing the drafts, sending them to the editors, receiving a prompt reply from them, making changes and sending it back very quickly to the editors,” said Redd. “There was a bit of suspense and a bit of a race to get it done correctly and quickly.”

In the past year, Redd has written another manuscript about Civil War medicine, as well as several fiction manuscripts that he hopes to develop and publish in the future. For more information about Redd’s writing, contact rredd@waynesburg.edu or call 724-852-3419.

Founded in 1849 by the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, Waynesburg University is located on a traditional campus in the hills of southwestern Pennsylvania, with three additional sites located in the Pittsburgh region. The University is one of only 22 Bonner Scholar schools in the country, offering local, regional and international opportunities to touch the lives of others through service.

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Ashley Wise, Director of University Relations

724-852-7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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b2ap3_thumbnail_5-16-Gettysburg-monuments.pngWaynesburg University recently adopted two monuments at Gettysburg National Military Park. The monuments will be maintained and preserved during the University’s annual fall Faith, Learning and Service Immersion Trip to Gettysburg.

The adopted monuments include the 140th Pennsylvania Infantry – West of Sickles and the 1st Regiment US Sharpshooters (Andrews SS-MA) – Zeigler’s Grove.

Rea Redd, director of the Eberly Library, is the team leader for the Gettysburg service trips and presented the project to the University in an effort to form a long-term service agreement between Waynesburg University and the Gettysburg National Military Park.

“Students who participate in these service learning trips to care for our adopted monuments will help to preserve our nation’s heritage of freedom and the beauty of the natural environment,” said Redd. “The monuments represent the stories of soldiers, several of whom are Waynesburg alumni and Medal of Honor recipients.”

Redd will volunteer with the students to help educate them and make connections between their real-life experiences and American history.

“The monuments are also memorials to Gettysburg civilians who performed heroic deeds in caring for the wounded or burying the dead,” added Redd. “Learning their stories will help students think about how to respond should they ever find themselves living through the kind of local devastation that followed the battle of Gettysburg.”

The roles and responsibilities of the adoption agreement state that tasks may include raking, seeding, erosion control, litter pick up, brush clearing, fence repair and/or restoration, clearing/restacking stone walls, painting, weed and/or exotic plant removal and other general work as directed by park personnel.

“Students will now have the opportunity to learn about history outside of the classroom by volunteering on the battlefield,” said Kelley Hardie, assistant dean of student services. “One of the many goals of our service trips is for students to make the connections between academics and service, and this certainly fulfills that mission.”

Founded in 1849 by the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, Waynesburg University is located on a traditional campus in the hills of southwestern Pennsylvania, with three additional sites located in the Pittsburgh region. The University is a member of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU) and is one of only 21 Bonner Scholar schools in the country, offering local, regional and international opportunities to touch the lives of others through service.

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Ashley Wise, Associate Director of University Relations

724-852-7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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John Thompsonb2ap3_thumbnail_thompson.png
Systems Librarian and Theological Cataloger, Eberly Library

John Thompson has worked at Waynesburg University for 16 years in the beautiful Eberly Library, where he maintains the library computer system (used for ordering, cataloging and checking out books), and personally selects books on religion and theology to be added to the library’s collection. John can be found on the library’s main floor, facing the Guesman Reading and Reflection Room.

How did you end up at Waynesburg University?

I grew up in Waynesburg and graduated from high school here. But I went to college near Chicago and went to library school at the University of Chicago. I had different library jobs in Chicago for about 20 years, but soon after I got married this job opened up and I decided it was a good idea to move back to Waynesburg.

What’s your favorite spot on campus?

The “Skylight Conference Room” on the top floor of the library. From there I can see the street that I live on.

What’s your most memorable WU moment?

Working with my Fiat Lux class to clear a remote cemetery in 2015. When we went there the place was completely overgrown, and there were so many students that it was quite chaotic. But everyone got involved in their own tasks and by the time we were done, the fence was painted, the brush was cleared away, some of the tombstones had been restored, and we had a lot to be proud of!

How has WU changed in the time you have worked here?

The biggest change seems to be the fact that the university is able to attract students who are more engaged, more willing to serve, and more serious about their Christian faith.

What do you consider the most special or unique part of your job?

I am honored to be able to help students to grow in their Christian faith while they are in college. First, I try to select the most helpful books to buy for our library’s theology collection. Second, I am the faculty sponsor for the Orthodox Christian Fellowship. In this, I try to bring both Orthodox and non-Orthodox students to a deeper appreciation of the Orthodox faith through prayer, discussion, and attendance at Orthodox services. Third, I teach Biblical & Ministry Studies classes as an adjunct professor. I have taught Introduction to the New Testament in the past; right now I am teaching Readings in New Testament Greek. This is an excellent way to learn more about the origins of the Christian faith.

For more information on Eberly Library and the work John and his team do, click here!

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