Kimberly Baston

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The best artwork of Waynesburg University students will be displayed in the Benedum Fine Arts Gallery Monday, Nov. 28, to Friday, Dec. 9. The student art exhibition will open with a reception Nov. 28 from 6 to 8 p.m. The exhibit and reception are free, and the public is cordially invited to attend.

At the end of each semester, the University’s art professors choose a selection of artwork created by their students during the semester. The artwork encompasses a variety of mediums, and Andrew Heisey, assistant professor of art, said seeing the creativity of students is an enjoyable process.

“Each semester, it is very exciting to see what students at Waynesburg come up with,” said Heisey. “Every student is unique, so you never know what will be on display.”

Heisey said the exhibit gives students who have never seen their work on display a chance to showcase their talent in a gallery for everyone to enjoy. It shows them the value of the time and effort dedicated to their art.

The Benedum Fine Arts Gallery is open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday.

For more information, call 724-852-3274.

Founded in 1849 by the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, Waynesburg University is located on a traditional campus in the hills of southwestern Pennsylvania, with three additional sites located in the Pittsburgh region. The University is a member of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU) and is one of only 21 Bonner Scholar schools in the country, offering local, regional and international opportunities to touch the lives of others through service.

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Ashley Wise, Associate Director of University Relations

724-852-7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

 

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A Waynesburg University professor was recently published in the online journal The Imaginative Conservative. Dr. William Batchelder, assistant professor of history, wrote an article that appeared in the journal Sept. 22.

The article, entitled “The Counsel of Despair? Albert J. Nock on Self-Government,” explores the ideas of political theorist Albert J. Nock, whose written works were widely published. Batchelder said Nock was a radical (a Libertarian in today’s terms) but saw no point in trying to convince others to align with his views, as he thought most people could not be educated.

“The question I posed is, ‘Why would he bother writing on political theory if he felt there was little to no chance of having any real-world impact?’” said Batchelder. “I think the answer is that Nock wrote these works out of a sense of duty to philosophy.”

Batchelder sent the article to The Imaginative Conservative after a writer he admires from Hillsdale College expressed interest in Nock. He expanded the article from a paper he presented at a conference earlier this year, and the revised version was approved and published by the journal.

Batchelder said he is pleased to be published in The Imaginative Conservative, as it appeals to a wide variety of Christians and Conservatives.

“It is a thoughtful, interesting website,” said Batchelder. “The website publishes on a broad spectrum of topics, and there is always something fun or provocative to read there.”

Batchelder has also been published in a peer-reviewed journal called Anamnesis and online at Nomocracy in Politics. He said the process of getting work published drives him to rethink the work he does with his students in the classroom, sharpening his knowledge and students’ experience.

Batchelder’s article can be read at http://www.theimaginativeconservative.org/2016/09/counsel-despair-albert-j-nock-self-government-batchelder.html.

Founded in 1849 by the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, Waynesburg University is located on a traditional campus in the hills of southwestern Pennsylvania, with three additional sites located in the Pittsburgh region. The University is a member of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU) and is one of only 21 Bonner Scholar schools in the country, offering local, regional and international opportunities to touch the lives of others through service.

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Ashley Wise, Associate Director of University Relations

724-852-7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

 

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Students in the Waynesburg University Forensic Science Club will hold a community outreach event in conjunction with a local drug and alcohol awareness group Wednesday, Nov. 9. The University students leading the event will work with Communities That Care, an organization that focuses on educating at-risk youth, to hold the event at West Sides in Waynesburg.

The event will begin at 6:30 p.m. with opening games, and then the participants will be presented with an informational session about the risk, effects and community issues associated with heroin use. University students will lead participants through a mock crime scene and an interview with a suspected heroine user regarding a friend who overdosed. The event will end at approximately 8:30 p.m.

This is the second consecutive year that Waynesburg students will collaborate with Communities That Care for the presentation. The event is one of many that showcase University students’ desire to use their talents and education to serve the surrounding community.

For more information, contact Faith Musko, instructor of forensic science, at 724-852-7716 or fmusko@waynesburg.edu.

Founded in 1849 by the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, Waynesburg University is located on a traditional campus in the hills of southwestern Pennsylvania, with three additional sites located in the Pittsburgh region. The University is a member of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU) and is one of only 21 Bonner Scholar schools in the country, offering local, regional and international opportunities to touch the lives of others through service.

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Ashley Wise, Associate Director of University Relations

724-852-7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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The Waynesburg University Department of Fine Arts will host its second Chamber Works Concert Thursday, Nov. 10, at noon. Held in the Marsh Center below Roberts Chapel, the concert is free and the public is cordially invited to attend.

Chamber Works concerts are held twice each semester and provide an outlet for the work of the University’s small musical ensembles. Audience members may hear selections from woodwind, brass, percussion, jazz or other classifications.

In addition to larger musical groups on campus like the Symphonic Band, musically inclined Waynesburg students can participate in small ensembles that are specifically tailored to a certain type of instrumentation. Small ensembles allow University students to hone their skills during weekly rehearsals and showcase their talents through intimate performances.

For more information, contact the Benedum Fine Arts Center at 724-852-7638. 

Founded in 1849 by the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, Waynesburg University is located on a traditional campus in the hills of southwestern Pennsylvania, with three additional sites located in the Pittsburgh region. The University is a member of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU) and is one of only 21 Bonner Scholar schools in the country, offering local, regional and international opportunities to touch the lives of others through service.

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Ashley Wise, Assistant Director of University Relations

724-852-7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

 

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b2ap3_thumbnail_10-20-Comm-White-House.jpgSenior communication majors Kyle Dawson and Tyler Wolfe accompanied Bill Molzon, assistant professor of communication and director of TV operations, to the White House Oct. 5 and 6 to attend and report on the Pittsburgh Penguins’ Stanley Cup Championship ceremony with President Barack Obama.

Dawson and Wolfe, who are both involved in TV productions at the University, recorded the event and produced video footage reporting on the ceremony. Many other Washington and Pittsburgh media outlets were also in attendance to document Obama’s congratulatory speech offered to the Penguins following their Stanley Cup win this summer.

Molzon said his goal in taking students to the event was “to create a learning experience for the students that can’t be duplicated in the classroom.” The students agreed that the trip was invaluable for learning about TV production and covering major events.

It was the fifth time that Molzon took Waynesburg students to Washington for such an event. The first time was in 1991 after the Penguins won their first Stanley Cup.

Molzon coordinated this year’s trip with the White House Press Office and Waynesburg alumnus Bill Ingalls, a project manager and senior photographer for NASA. Ingalls lives in the Washington area and has hosted Molzon and his students on each of the trips, including this one.

“I call him our D.C. field producer because he knows the city like the back [of his hand],” said Molzon. “He gave [Dawson] and [Wolfe] a personal D.C. tour.”

The group arrived at the White House early Thursday, Oct. 6 to set up equipment in the White House East Room. They were able to set up their camera in a prime location since some Pittsburgh news stations did not make it to the 9 a.m. set time.

“It’s not every day that you get to be in a room in the White House, which not many people have the privilege to be in, let alone with all kinds of big-time media members, all of the Penguins’ team and families, on top of dignified and notable government officials and, to top that all off, the President of the United States,” said Dawson.

Dawson and Wolfe also had the opportunity to observe the morning daily briefing given by the White House press secretary in the James S. Brady Press Briefing Room.

Wolfe, who served as the TV camera operator during the ceremony, said he enjoyed learning from the media professionals in attendance.

“We got to network with a bunch of professional photographers from the networks that have been doing this for decades,” said Wolfe, “as well as see part of the daily briefing that is given to the press.”

Molzon emphasized that networking is an important part of covering the White House ceremony. Meeting people who work in bigger media markets can open opportunities. For instance, one media member informed Molzon of a possible TV journalism internship that may be available at the White House in the future.

Dawson said the experiences exemplified the wide array of real-world experience offered by the Department of Communication on a regular basis.

“We were the only student or college media members in attendance at the event,” said Dawson. “I think that says something about the department here and the opportunities we receive. This was a once-in-a-lifetime chance.”

For more information about Waynesburg University’s Department of Communication, visit www.waynesburg.edu/undergraduate/undergraduate-majors/communication. 

Founded in 1849 by the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, Waynesburg University is located on a traditional campus in the hills of southwestern Pennsylvania, with three additional sites located in the Pittsburgh region. The University is a member of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU) and is one of only 21 Bonner Scholar schools in the country, offering local, regional and international opportunities to touch the lives of others through service.

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Ashley Wise, Associate Director of University Relations

724-852-7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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