Kimberly Baston

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b2ap3_thumbnail_GettysburgService.jpgThis month, 33 Waynesburg University students will participate in four Faith, Learning and Service Immersion trips during fall break. Led by University faculty and staff members, students will serve in Gettysburg, Pa.; the local Greene County area; and Wheeling, W.Va.

Gettysburg National Military Park – Gettysburg, Pa.

Rea Redd, director of the Eberly Library at the University, will lead 16 students on a trip to Gettysburg, Pa., from Sunday, Oct. 16, through Thursday, Oct. 20. The group will partner with Gettysburg National Military Park and the Gettysburg Battlefield Preservation Association at the Daniel Lady Farm to assist with landscaping, ground maintenance and other tasks to help beautify historic locations.

Students will also have the opportunity to learn about Civil War history and build an appreciation for the importance of serving at historic sites.

Greene County Habitat for Humanity – Waynesburg, Pa.

Six University students will work with Green County’s Habitat for Humanity chapter from Sunday, Oct. 16, through Thursday, Oct. 20. The group will gather insight into the Greene County community as they work on a home-building project for someone in need.

The trip will be led by Adrienne Tharp, coordinator of the Bonner Scholar Program; Chaley Knight, university counselor; Jessica Sumpter, assistant dean of Student Services; Jody Rawlings, instructor of nursing; Marie Coffman, director of Career Services and Placement; and Matthew Pioch, resident director.

Greene County Immersion – Waynesburg, Pa.

Led by Kelley Hardie, assistant dean of Student Services, six students will serve across the Greene County community from Sunday, Oct. 16, through Friday, Oct. 21. The group will attend to the needs of seven organizations in Waynesburg and the surrounding area, including non-profit organizations and churches.

By being immersed in the local community through service, students will have the chance to connect with service sites and continue to build relationships throughout their time at Waynesburg.

Laughlin Chapel – Wheeling, W.Va.  

Five students will be serving at Laughlin Chapel in Wheeling, W.Va., from Monday, Oct. 17, through Thursday, Oct. 20. Julie Wise, a graduate assistant in Student Services at the University, will lead the group in assisting with the Chapel’s weekly after school programming for children in the area.

Founded in 1849 by the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, Waynesburg University is located on a traditional campus in the hills of southwestern Pennsylvania, with three additional sites located in the Pittsburgh region. The University is a member of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU) and is one of only 21 Bonner Scholar schools in the country, offering local, regional and international opportunities to touch the lives of others through service.

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Ashley Wise, Associate Director of University Relations

724-852-7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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Two Waynesburg University students traveled this summer from their hometowns in Western Pennsylvania to intern at Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana. Both had the opportunity to serve as undergraduate researchers in graduate student laboratories, though in different areas.

Junior Emily Ankrom, a biology major at Waynesburg, worked in the R.B. Wetherill Laboratory of Chemistry, which focuses on DNA nanotechnology.

Ankrom, with the help of a graduate student mentor, spent the summer researching how to visualize DNA liquid crystals. While Ankrom’s classes at Waynesburg significantly helped her understand scientific research concepts, she had little experience with DNA nanotechnology, which she said was one of the biggest difficulties of the internship.

“It was challenging right off the bat to enter into a research lab that focused on subject material almost completely foreign to me,” said Ankrom. “I had to spend quite a lot of time on my own, researching background information and reading scientific papers to understand what I would be doing.”

Thankfully, Ankrom had graduate students in the lab with her to mentor and guide her work. She loved being able to see firsthand how much Purdue’s graduate students and professors love what they do.

Ankrom is a member of the American Chemical Society and the Biology Club at Waynesburg. Other students in those organizations showed her how valuable an undergraduate research position could be and helped her apply. Now that she has research experience under her belt, Ankrom has solidified her aspirations to go to graduate school after Waynesburg.

“Before this research internship, I had no clue what grad school was like,” said Ankrom. “Being able to peer into the landscape of graduate school research has helped me visualize the journey I will be embarking on.”

Sophomore Lauren Petrina also secured a position as an undergraduate researcher at Purdue, but she was placed in a different lab than Ankrom. An engineering-chemistry major, Petrina worked in Professor Hilkka Kenttamaa’s lab, specializing in understanding crude oil.

Petrina entered into her research internship at Purdue just after her freshman year at Waynesburg, an unusual circumstance. Waynesburg professors in charge of the American Chemical Society, of which Petrina is a member, encouraged her to apply, though they warned her that freshmen usually don’t get accepted.

But a few months later, Petrina was in a lab with graduate students, getting more hands-on experience than she ever expected.

“I thought I was just going to be an assistant to the graduate students – that is not the case at all,” said Petrina. “I was able to ask questions, contribute my thoughts and feedback and even make suggestions.”

Petrina’s research included analyzing heavy crude oil to understand whether it can be converted to light crude oil, which is used in cars. Supplies of light crude oil have been depleted, so petroleum companies work with labs like Petrina’s to discover whether heavy crude oil is useful. Petrina said she would not have been able to complete her work without having taken Waynesburg’s organic and inorganic chemistry classes.

Like Ankrom, Petrina said the passion of the graduate students in her lab was evident, and she is grateful for the opportunity to work with them.

“If I decide to go to graduate school, I will already be ahead of the game because I will have had experience in a graduate laboratory,” said Petrina. “All of the knowledge I gained through this internship will be useful for the rest of my life.”

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b2ap3_thumbnail_9-28-Fall-visitation-day.jpgWaynesburg University will host a fall Visitation Day Saturday, Nov. 5, for high school students, transfer students and their families. The day will begin at 9 a.m. with registration in Roberts Chapel.

Following registration, students can participate in admissions and financial aid sessions, tour campus, meet with faculty in their elected major and enjoy lunch in the Benedum Dining Hall. The day concludes at approximately 1:30 p.m.

Waynesburg University’s mission is to educate students to make connections between faith, learning and serving so they might faithfully transform their communities and the world. Visiting the University in person allows interested students to see the mission and values of Waynesburg firsthand.

Waynesburg currently enrolls approximately 1,300 undergraduate students and offers more than 70 academic concentrations for students to study. The University has been consistently ranked nationally as a top school for value.

Although this is the last Visitation Day of the fall semester, personal visits are offered Monday through Friday at 9 a.m., 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.

For more information or to register, call 1-800-225-7393.

Founded in 1849 by the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, Waynesburg University is located on a traditional campus in the hills of southwestern Pennsylvania, with three additional sites located in the Pittsburgh region. The University is a member of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU) and is one of only 21 Bonner Scholar schools in the country, offering local, regional and international opportunities to touch the lives of others through service.

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Ashley Wise, Associate Director of University Relations

724-852-7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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b2ap3_thumbnail_9-27-Lamplighters.jpgThe Waynesburg University Lamplighters choir will offer a Disney-themed sing-along concert in the Goodwin Performing Arts Center Thursday, Oct. 13, from 5:15 to 6 p.m. Admission is free, and the public is cordially invited to attend. The Lamplighters will also offer the concert at an assembly at Waynesburg Central Elementary School on the morning of Oct. 13.

The choir will lead the audience in singing along to songs from Toy Story, The Lion King, Frozen and more. Disney characters from the movies represented may even make an appearance at the concert. Melanie Catana, director of choral music, said the concert is perfect for young children and hopes the music brings messages of joy and friendship to those who take part.

According to Catana, University students in the Lamplighters choir have been requesting to perform a Disney concert for years.

“We are already having a ball in rehearsal just preparing for this concert,” said Catana. “It is just a good time – singing purely for the love of it.”

Catana invites University students, in addition to children and parents in the community, to attend the concert and take part in the fun.

“The choir and the audience are both the performers for this event – we need all Disney lovers and singers on deck,” she said.

Tickets will be provided at the door prior to the event. For more information, contact Catana at 724-852-7639 or mcatana@waynesburg.edu.

Founded in 1849 by the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, Waynesburg University is located on a traditional campus in the hills of southwestern Pennsylvania, with three additional sites located in the Pittsburgh region. The University is a member of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU) and is one of only 21 Bonner Scholar schools in the country, offering local, regional and international opportunities to touch the lives of others through service.

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Ashley Wise, Associate Director of University Relations

724-852-7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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The first Chamber Works concert of the year will be hosted by the Waynesburg University Department of Fine Arts on Thursday, Oct. 6 at noon. Admission is free, and the public is cordially invited to attend the event, located in the Marsh Center below Roberts Chapel. 

The University is home to a number of small student ensembles that allow students from a variety of majors to showcase their musical talent in a specifically tailored small-group setting. Each of the two Chamber Works concerts during the semester feature a variety of small ensembles. Attendees have the opportunity to potentially hear woodwind, brass, percussion, jazz or other kinds of music.

Chamber Works concerts allow the campus and local community to experience what students in small ensembles work to perfect during weekly meetings and rehearsals. University small ensembles are available to serve using their musical talent at local organizations. 

For more information, contact the Benedum Fine Arts Center at 724-852-7638.

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Ashley Wise, Associate Director of University Relations

724.852.7675 or awise@waynesburg.edu

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