Outcomes Arrow

 

b2ap3_thumbnail_Frick-and-Charlie-Gerow.jpgHope Frick, a senior public relations major from Elizabethtown, Pa., met Quantum Communications’ CEO, Charlie Gerow, on Waynesburg University’s campus during her junior year. After making a positive impression, Frick was offered an internship with the company in Harrisburg, Pa., for the summer of 2012 and, eventually, 2013.

“Charlie is extremely well connected in almost every political circle throughout the nation, so I jumped at the opportunity to work with someone so influential,” said Frick.

Working in close proximity to the state Capitol had its perks. The environment not only helped Frick see the interworking’s of a highly populated, central location, it also enabled her to meet with Governor Tom Corbett at Quantum’s June Policy Briefing, which was Frick’s favorite moment of her internship.

On a typical day, Frick conducted online news searches for Quantum’s clients and managed the blog, Facebook and Twitter accounts for the Friends of Natural Gas Alliance. Additionally, Frick helped plan a few of Quantum’s monthly events which host several business leaders, politicians, reporters and other associates of the company to an open forum discussion.

According to Frick, her time spent with faculty, in departmental coursework and as secretary of Waynesburg University’s Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA) chapter at Waynesburg gave her the confidence she needed to excel within her tasks at Quantum.

“As a student, Hope took advantage of every opportunity presented to her and always went above and beyond course or department requirements,” said Pamela Cunningham, lecturer at Waynesburg University. “In doing so, Hope has become driven and even more passionate about the field that, in my humble opinion, will be fortunate to have her.”

Hits: 1662

A 40-hour-work week as an intern at Fulton Mortgage Company was more than processing mortgage applications, performing compliance checks and contacting employers and insurance companies for junior forensic accounting major Alyssa Daniel.

Her experience as a mortgage processor was something very few interns have the opportunity to experience: upbeat.

“I would have to say the funniest thing I did was help some people decorate our coworker's chair and desk with bubble wrap while he was at lunch,” Daniel jokingly said.

The ability to interact with her coworkers in a friendly, lighthearted manner was something memorable for Daniel, but her internship proved to be greater than good memories made with colleagues. It allowed the Manheim, Pa., native to grow accustomed to the type of office environment and career path she desires to obtain in the future.

From May 18 to August 9, Daniel worked in the office as a mortgage processor intern in which she had the opportunity to gain much knowledge in the field from day to day.

“My favorite aspect about the internship was learning to analyze tax returns to determine monthly income,” said Daniel.

With courses such as Investments and Federal Income Tax offered at Waynesburg University, Daniel was mentally prepared to take on her responsibilities at Fulton. Moreover, Daniel’s involvement in activities during semesters as a varsity tennis player; teaching assistant to Anthony Bocchini, professor of business administration at Waynesburg University; treasurer for American Medical Student Association (AMSA) and Waynesburg University women’s tennis Fellowship of Christian Athlete’s (FCA) representative, only accentuated her merit for the position.

“Alyssa was an excellent choice for Fulton because of her strong work ethic and her professional attitude,” said Bocchini.

Through a recommendation made by an employee at Fulton, Daniel was instructed how to apply for the internship. After submitting an application and participating in a phone interview, she was offered a position for the summer of 2013.

“I applied for the internship because I wanted to do something that would give me work experience in my major field as well as help boost my resume,” said Daniel.

Even already having an idea of the things she would be doing at her internship, Daniel was still unaware of what the day-to-day procedures would be when she stepped foot in the office.

“I didn't really know what to expect going into the internship, since I didn't know much about mortgage banking, but it was definitely an enjoyable experience,” said Daniel.

As a student, Daniel receives the business department scholarship, Leadership scholarship, Margaret Bell Miller scholarship and AB Miller scholarship at Waynesburg University, which illustrates the intensity of devotion she places on learning and growing academically.

That same commitment was also utilized during her internship, making the experience as a whole, a success.

“I learned a lot of new information this summer that I can take and apply to my career in the future,” said Daniel. “And on a personal level, I made friends and networking connections that I really value.”

Hits: 1609

For senior business management major Alexander Henry, interning at PNC Bank for the summer of 2013 meant having the chance to complete significant tasks for the benefit of the company, which was something he looked forward to every day.

“I decided to apply because I knew it would be an awesome resume builder, and I would get some great real world experience,” said Henry.

PNC is a company which offers a wide range of services for their customers, ranging anywhere from corporations, government entities, individuals, small businesses and more.

The Bridgeville, Pa., native worked 40 hours-a-week for the company June 12 through August 16 within the Finance Credit Reporting portion of PNC.

After applying online, Henry began the grueling interview process which consisted of three phone interviews and a fourth face-to-face interview in Pittsburgh, Pa., after which he acquired the title of Financial Analyst intern.

As a member of the Waynesburg University Yellow Jacket football team, president of the Investments Club and vice president of ENACTUS at Waynesburg, Henry understood the effort needed to persevere.

“Alex is a strong student with a commitment to excellence,” said Joshua Chicarelli, assistant professor of business administration at Waynesburg University. “What sets Alex apart is his ability to think logically and then follow up on his thoughts with strong research and critical thinking skills.”

Henry’s weekly tasks consisted of assisting financial reporting; creating workbooks to calculate the financial impact and TDRs by concession type variances’; creating a segment equity balance and preferred dividend forecast; creating numerous VLookup functions within Excel; and performing peer analysis.

Overall, Henry’s internship was what he expected and more, giving him an experience of a lifetime.

Hits: 1497

b2ap3_thumbnail_Cochran-resized.jpgWhen he respectfully declined a full ride to a large Ohio state school, many of Isaiah Cochran’s high school friends thought he was crazy. But the aspiring neurosurgeon knew that God had something better in store for him – a life changing experience at Waynesburg University. After hearing of his acceptance into Waynesburg, a school he admired for rigorous academics and faithful service, and after receiving the supreme financial security offered by the Ohio Honors Scholarship, Cochran couldn’t decline the opportunity.  

“When I was notified that I received the Ohio Honors Scholarship, I was in my high school eighth period Spanish Class. I remember crying when I heard the news,” Cochran said. “All I know is the scholarship has allowed me to do things that most college students could only dream of; it has brought me one step closer to achieving my ultimate dream of making a difference in this world. God has blessed me in way that I cannot comprehend.”

One of those blessings resulted in an esteemed internship with a Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program, an initiative sponsored by the National Science Foundation (NSF).

The junior pre-med student and star Waynesburg University tennis player from Akron, Ohio, was selected from a pool of thousands nationwide to participate in the Sackler/NSF REU: Integrated Research at the Frontiers of the Biological, Physical and Engineering Sciences at Yale University's Raymond and Beverly Sackler Institute.

The Sackler/NSF REU program provides research training to students for 10 weeks under the mentorship of faculty members through research. In accordance with the program leadership team, students selected for the program choose a research project from three areas: mechanics of cellular processes, protein function and misfolding, or technology and method development for integrated research.

Cochran had the opportunity to participate in workshops and seminars ranging from laboratory methods to applying to graduate school. He also presented his work at a research symposium, which was held in conjunction with Yale's Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF) program and the Center of Excellence for Materials Research and Innovation (CEMRI) Center for Research on Interface Structure & Phenomena (CRISP) REU program at Yale.

“I think Isaiah made great strides, both intellectually and technically. Intellectually, I think that putting together his presentation and then getting up and presenting in front of a crowd was a great accomplishment,” Cochran’s Yale internship supervisor, Dr. Megan King, said. “In the lab, I think he gained tremendous progress in working independently and competently at the bench.”

Challenged by the meticulous work and demanding time constraints at Yale, Cochran reminded himself of the many people rooting for him and of the invaluable research experience that he would gain. Though he was surrounded by new faces in an unfamiliar lab, Cochran felt right at home thanks to his laboratory and classroom training at Waynesburg University.

“It was very challenging. Some weeks I was in the lab for 60 hours a week trying to induce a double strand break into the yeast genome,” Cochran said. “I knew it would take a lot of hard work; what I did not expect was to be so well prepared for it. I can only thank the professors at Waynesburg for my strong science background.”

During the internship, Cochran worked in a lab focusing on DNA repair pathways. His summer project included inducing the double strand so that two distinct proteins could potentially ligate the DNA back together. As DNA repair becomes more successful, Cochran said it could usurp medicine as a way to cure diseases like cancer and Alzheimer’s.

“My favorite internship experience was learning and building a great foundation that I hope I can use as a clinician in neurology as well as a researcher in neurology,” Cochran said. “I also made some amazing connections. I think they will remember that a student from Waynesburg did a good job.”

With a passion for enhancing the medical world, Cochran initiated an American Medical Student Association (AMSA) chapter as a freshman at Waynesburg, but he didn’t stop there. Now a junior, he serves as a national Pre-Medical Region 1 Director for the AMSA, with responsibilities to oversee more than 105 university and college AMSA Chapters across 12 states.

“Medicine is not about self-glory; it is about doctoring, whether you have ‘Dr.’ in front of your name or not,” said Cochran. “There is a revolution coming in medicine and it is geared towards patient equality.”

He has relished the hands-on learning opportunities afforded to him at Waynesburg and has cited professors, coaches and even the President of Waynesburg University for personal help and support along the way.

“I have learned so much at Waynesburg. The professors give us a support system. They know you and they know what will make you successful,” Cochran said. “I have had this fire in me to change the world since I was in 8th grade. With the opportunities that I have been given, I know that it is just a matter of time before I do.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hits: 1953

b2ap3_thumbnail_LeCain_Elizabeth_7.JPGWaynesburg University compels many students to step outside of their comfort zones when applying to internship positions. But for Elizabeth LeCain, a senior forensic science major from Andover, Mass., a cross-country road trip to her research internship in Golden, Colo., didn’t scare her at all.

“Being able to drive across the country was great,” LeCain said. “I managed to see half of the states and many of the National Parks, which was just incredible.”

LeCain spent the summer of 2013 as an Undergraduate Research Associate with the Colorado School of Mines as a part of a national Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program sponsored by the National Science Foundation (NSF). She synthesized one of several different monomers to create a polymer, working toward the overall goal of improving solar cell efficiency.

The senior, who is actively involved in University student chapters and activities including the American Chemical Society Student Affiliates, Gamma Sigma Epsilon Chemistry Honorary Society, Kamma Mu Epsilon Mathematics Honorary Society and serves as a lab assistant in the department of chemistry, believes that her extra-curricular studies helped secure the internship.

“Most of my time at the internship was spent trying to purify different products so that they would be of high enough quality to use in a future reaction,” LeCain said. “My favorite part was when we finally formed the polymer and were able to see it precipitate, indicating that the polymer had in fact formed.”

The process of forming the polymer required much trial and error, as well as patience, practical application and laboratory experience. Mostly, LeCain said that her classes at Waynesburg University aided immensely in her internship success.

“I learned several laboratory techniques in my labs at Waynesburg that I was able to utilize in Colorado,” LeCain said. “Also, the skills I have acquired in keeping a lab notebook and writing lab reports at Waynesburg were helpful in doing those same tasks at my internship.”

Though she expected to work in the Colorado School of Mines’ laboratories most of the summer, LeCain said she didn’t anticipate to be granted such autonomy in her research.

“I wasn't expecting to be on my own as much as I was, but that forced me to solve a lot of problems,” she said. “This reminded me that there is a reason for everything and helped me to keep an open mind toward all the changes I had to make. I was there to learn, and I was able to do that. There was a lot of new information I had to absorb and it was a challenge, but Waynesburg University prepared me for that.”

 

 

 

Hits: 1647