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Chemistry Course Offerings

CHE 105 Contemporary Topics in Chemistry

4 credits

A lecture and laboratory appreciation course specifically designed to introduce chemical topics that affect our everyday lives. In addition, the impact (hazards as well as benefits) on society of many modern day chemical products will be discussed. A brief treatment of measurement, atoms, bonding, and structure will be presented. Topics such as the chemistry of personal care products, plastics, pesticides, fertilizers, food additives, soaps and detergents, fossil and nuclear energy, air and water pollution, medicinals, nerve gases, and some important chemicals of commerce will be discussed. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory period each week. This course is intended for non-science majors. (Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit.)

CHE 106 Practical Chemistry for Life

4 credits

A lecture and laboratory course designed to include inorganic, organic and biochemical topics directly related to the health professions. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory period each week. This course is intended for Athletic Training majors and is also open to non-science majors.

CHE 107 Introduction to Pharmaceutical Science

1 credits

Seminar class surveying various career paths that are relevant to pharmaceutical sciences as well as options within the Pharmaceutical Science major. Required for Pharmaceutical Science Majors and recommended for chemistry and biology majors with interest in the discipline. Seminar meets weekly for half of the semester. Fall

CHE 121 General Chemistry I

3 credits

A treatment of the states of matter and the laws governing chemical and physical changes (including kinetics and equilibria), founded on modern concepts of atomic structure and chemical bonding. First semester. Co-requisite: CHE 121L and MAT 108 (or a satisfactory score on the Mathematics Placement Examination.) This course is intended for science majors. Fall

CHE 121L Laboratory for General Chemistry I

1 credit

A laboratory course to compliment General Chemistry I. Students build skills in making solutions, dilutions, using instrumentation, writing laboratory reports, and collecting proper documentation during experiments. This laboratory must accompany CHE 121 to fulfill major and general education requirements. Co-requisite: CHE 121 and MAT 108. Fall

CHE 122 General Chemistry II

3 credits

The course centers on a systematic study of the chemical elements and their compounds, with emphasis on reactions and equilibria in aqueous solution and includes classification and anion separation and identification. Second Semester. Prerequisite: CHE 121 with a grade of C- or better. Co-requisite: CHE 122L and MAT 205. Spring

CHE 122L Laboratory for General Chemistry II

1 credit

A laboratory course to compliment General Chemistry II. Students build skills in performing fundamental laboratory techniques such as titrations, writing laboratory reports, and collecting proper documentation during experiments. This laboratory must accompany CHE 122 to fulfill major and general education requirements. Prerequisites: CHE 121 with a grade of C- or better. Corequisite: CHE 122 and MAT 205. Spring

CHE 205 Environmental Chemistry

4 credits

A lecture and laboratory course that applies chemical principles to the study of sources, reactions, transport, effects, and fates of chemical species in water, soil, and air environments. Topics covered will be environmental chemistry and chemical cycles, fundamentals of aquatic chemistry, oxidation/reduction, phase interactions, water pollution and treatment, atmospheric chemistry, gaseous inorganic and organic air pollutants, soil chemistry, and nature and sources of hazardous wastes. The laboratory will involve documentation, environmental sampling techniques, and analysis of chemical species in soil and water samples. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory period each week. Prerequisites: CHE 121 and 122 or equivalent with grade of C- or better. Fall

CHE 206 Inorganic Chemistry

4 credits

This course provides the student with an introduction to fundamental concepts in inorganic chemistry as well as a more comprehensive study of typical general chemistry topics such as acids and bases, kinetics, equilibrium, and electrochemistry. More advanced topics that will be covered include molecular orbital theory, coordination chemistry, and a systematic review of inorganic compounds. Special topics such as nanotechnology and inorganic materials will also be introduced. Three hours of lecture and one hour of recitation each week. Prerequisite: CHE 121 with grade of C- or better. Corequisite: CHE 206L and MAT 205. Spring

CHE 206L Laboratory for Inorganic Chemistry

1 credit

A laboratory course to compliment Inorganic Chemistry. Students will perform inorganic synthesis experiments as well as utilize foundational instrumentation. This laboratory must accompany CHE 206 to fulfill major and general education requirements. Prerequisite: CHE 121 with a grade of C- or better. Corequisites: CHE 206 and MAT 205. Spring

CHE 207 Organic and Biochemical Concepts

4 credits

A survey of organic and biochemical concepts. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory period each week. Prerequisite: CHE 122 with grade of C- or better. (Fall of odd numbered years)

CHE 211 Organic Chemistry I

4 credits

The first semester of a modern exploration of organic chemistry, employing recent theoretical concepts and current techniques; laboratory emphasis on techniques, synthesis, and qualitative organic analysis. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory period each week. Prerequisites: CHE 122 or equivalent with a grade of C- or above. Fall

CHE 212 Organic Chemistry II

4 credits

The continuation course in organic chemistry, employing recent theoretical concepts and current techniques; laboratory emphasis on techniques, synthesis, and qualitative organic analysis. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory period each week. Prerequisite: CHE 211 with a grade of C- or above. Spring

CHE 301 Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics & Kinetics

4 credits

A detailed and quantitative study of the nature of molecules and chemical phenomena. Topics of in-depth exploration include the application of kinetics and thermodynamics to describe the behavior, flow, and interaction of energy with matter in a wide variety of systems. Prerequisites: CHE 206 with grade of C- or better. Co-requisites: MAT 212; PHY 202 or 212. (Spring 2021, Fall 2022, and alternate years)

CHE 302 Physical Chemistry : Quantum Mechanics & Spectroscopy

3 credits

A detailed and quantitative study of the nature of molecules and chemical phenomena. Topics of in-depth exploration include materials, statistical mechanics, spectroscopy, and quantum mechanics. Prerequisite: CHE 206 with grade of C- or better. Co-requisite: MAT 213; PHY 202 or 212. (Fall 2021, Spring 2023, and alternate years)

CHE 306 Topics in Inorganic Chemistry

1 credits

This course will focus on molecular symmetry with a general overview of bonding in inorganic chemistry. (Spring of even numbered years)

CHE 311 Analytical Chemistry

4 credits

Volumetric, gravimetric, electrochemical, separation, and an introduction to instrumental methods. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory period each week. Prerequisite: CHE 122 or equivalent, and CHE 212 each with grade of C- or better. Fall

CHE 312 Instrumental Analysis (Cross-listed as FSC 312 and PHY 312)

5 credits

Theory and practice of modern analytical techniques emphasizing spectrophotometric, chromatographic, and electrochemical methods. Three hours of lecture and two three-hour laboratory periods each week. Prerequisite: CHE 311 with grade of C- or better. Spring

CHE 321 Biochemistry I (Cross-listed as BIO 321)

3 credits

A survey of the fundamentals of biochemistry including such topics as lipids, carbohydrates, proteins, nucleic acids, enzymes and cellular metabolism. Three hours of lecture each week. The laboratory (CHE 321L) contains qualitative and quantitative laboratory experiments on the nature and properties of biological materials. Prerequisite: CHE 212 with grade of C- or better. Fall

CHE 321L Biochemistry Lab (Cross-listed as BIO 321L)

1 credit

The laboratory compliments CHE 321 (Biochemistry I) and contains qualitative and quantitative laboratory experiments on the nature and properties of biological materials. Co-requisite: CHE 321. Fall

CHE 322 Biochemistry II

3 credits

A continuation of Biochemistry I. Metabolic processing and their conservation among widely divergent organisms. Cellular processes, their interrelation and regulation. Biochemical techniques and their applications to a variety of current biological problems. Three hours of lecture. Prerequisite: CHE 321 with grade of C- or better. (Spring of odd numbered years)

CHE 325 Forensic Chemistry (Cross-listed as FSC 325)

4 credits

A course designed to provide a fundamental understanding of the various instrumentation, techniques, and physical methods available to the forensic chemist in the analysis of a range of materials commonly encountered as physical evidence in criminal investigations. The lecture and lab provides additional laboratory/instrumental experience in forensic and chemical analysis beyond the traditional instrumental analysis course (CHE/FSC 312). Specific areas of study include forensic identification of illicit drugs, fire debris analysis, and the examination of textile fibers, glass, paint, and soil. The role of chemical analysis and its importance to the judiciary process as well as the roles and responsibilities of the forensic chemist is explored. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory period each week. Prerequisite: CHE/FSC 312 with grade of C- or better. Spring

CHE 327 Advanced Spectroscopy Lab

1 credit

A one credit hour laboratory course that further examines the topic of spectroscopy and interpretation of chemical spectra. Application of this course allows for structure elucidation of organic molecules and natural products. Topics to be discussed will be 1-D and 2-D nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared spectroscopy, UV-Vis, and mass spectroscopy. One three-hour laboratory period each week. Prerequisites: CHE 211 and 212 with a grade of C- or better. Spring

CHE 385 Chemistry Seminar I (Cross-Listed as FSC 385)

1 credit

A seminar course designed to provide students with skills complimentary to the traditional coursework. Participants will learn proper literature search techniques, undertake ethics analyses, and practice technical writing skills. This course, in conjunction with CHE 485 and 499, satisfies the oral competency requirement in the General Education curriculum. Prerequisites: Chemistry or Forensic Science Program junior status. Fall

CHE 399 Undergraduate Research (Cross-listed as FSC 399)

1-6 credits

A course requiring a literature search and original laboratory work on a selected research topic. Work to be arranged with the individual faculty member.

CHE 406 Advanced Organic Chemistry

3 credits

Selected advanced topics from such areas as heterocyclics, natural products, reaction mechanisms, stereochemistry, physical organic chemistry, and kinetics. Second semester. Three hours of lecture each week. Prerequisite: CHE 212 with grade of C- or better. (Fall of even numbered years)

CHE 407 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

3 credits

This is an Advanced Inorganic Chemistry course that explores advanced topics of coordination chemistry, complexes, ligand types and organometallic chemistry. Topics include transition metal carbonyls and derivatives pi-bonded organometallic compounds and substitution reactions of metal ion and organometallic complexes. The chemistry and physical properties of transition metal compounds including their spectral and magnetic properties will be treated. This course will include transition state theory, chemical kinetics, reaction mechanisms and rate expressions. Special topics of homogeneous catalysis, heterogeneous catalysis and an introduction to the biological significance of inorganic compounds are discussed. Prerequisite: CHE 206 and 212 with grade of C- or better. (Spring of even numbered years)

CHE 409 Advanced Physical Chemistry

3 credits

This course examines at an advanced level quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics and their application to the study of molecular bonds and properties. The course is mathematically demanding and requires a thorough knowledge of calculus, as well as an understanding of the solution of differential equations, vector and matrix notation and probability theory. The course includes a computational “laboratory” in which the student will use computational software to predict the properties and behavior of a selected molecule. Prerequisite: CHE 301 or 302 with grade of C- or better. (Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit.)

CHE 415 Medical Chemistry

3 credits

Introduction to the modern drug development theory and practice with a focus on small molecules. Case studies of recently approved drugs and use of computational tools for designing drugs will be discussed. Pre-requisites: CHE 212 and CHE 321 with a C-or better. (Spring of odd numbered years)

CHE 465 Internship

3-6 credits

The internship is a program in which senior chemistry majors gain practical chemical experience with cooperating industries or governmental agencies. All internships (summer or one academic semester) will continue for at least 10 weeks. A minimum of 200 hours experience is required for 3 semester hours of credit and a minimum of 400 hours experience is required for 6 semester hours of credit. The exact duration and weekly hours of the assignment will vary with the cooperating agency; however, the total hours indicated above will normally translate to a program of 20 or 40 hours per week for 10 weeks. The student must submit a written internship request to the department chair at least 6 months prior to the anticipated starting date. The request must be approved by the instructor and the department before formal application to the cooperating agencies is initiated. This course satisfies the oral competency requirement in the General Education curriculum. Pass-fail grade. First semester, second semester, or summer.

CHE 475 Advanced Faith and Learning Integration

3 credits

In the spirit of the mission of Waynesburg University, this course intends to provide junior and senior level students with an unparalleled opportunity to integrate the Bible materials and its history of interpretation to the academic disciplines. Students who wish to engage in this level of theological reflection on vocation should consult with both their academic advisors and with the Chair of the Biblical and Ministry Studies Major Program. See page 80 for further information. This course will not substitute for senior capstone/research courses required in the majors. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing; three credits in BMS courses; 3.00 minimum grade point average. (Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit.)

CHE 485 Chemistry Seminar II (Cross-listed as FSC 485)

1 credit

A seminar course designed to provide students with skills complimentary to the traditional coursework. Participants will give progress reports on undergraduate research projects, interact with professional speakers, learn proper literature search techniques, undertake ethics analyses, and practice technical writing skills. This course, in conjunction with CHE 385 and 499, satisfies the oral competency requirement in the General Education curriculum. Prerequisites: Chemistry or Forensic Science Program senior status. Fall

CHE 195, 295, 395, 495 Special Topics

3 credits

CHE 499 Capstone Research (formerly CHE 499, Senior Research)

1 credit

A course requiring the completion of an original research project and oral presentation of this work. Upon completion of the project, a comprehensive and well-documented research report written in the style of an ACS chemistry journal article is also required. This course, in conjunction with CHE 385 and 485, satisfies the oral competency requirement in the General Education curriculum.